An Introduction to Old Order and Conservative Mennonite Groups: People's Place Book, Issue 12

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Good Books, Jan 1, 1996 - Religion - 252 pages
1 Review
     
     A leading scholar introduces and explains the history, lifestyle, customs, and beliefs of both the Old Order and the Conservative Mennonites—two growing separatist movements of Mennonites in North America today. Full of anecdotes and photographs.

     
     This book tells a story which until now has not been available in such an interesting and comprehensive form. What holds these people together? Why are they growing in number? Where do they live? The Old Order Mennonites are less well known than the Amish, but are similar in many beliefs and practices. Some Old Order Mennonites drive horses and buggies. Others use cars for transportation. Conservative Mennonite groups vary a great deal, but in general espouse strong faith and family life and believe that how they live should distinguish them from the larger society around them. 
     
     The author details courtship and wedding practices, methods of worship, dress, transportation, and vocation. Never before has there been such an inside account of these people and their lives. The author spent years conferring and interviewing members of the various groups, trying to portray their history and their story in a fair and accurate manner. An enjoyable, educational, inspiring book.

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Review: An Introduction to Old Order and Conservative Mennonite Groups (People's Place Book, #12)

User Review  - Samuel - Goodreads

An unmatched resource describing conservative Mennonite groups from the "Swiss" Mennonite background. Unfortunately becoming a bit dated, but the late Stephen Scott did a masterful job. Read full review

Contents

An Introduction to the Mennonites
3
Section One The Old Order Mennonites
11
The Conservative Mennonites
121
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

     
     Stephen E. Scott grew up in southwestern Ohio. He attended the Beavercreek Township schools. Cedarville College, and Wright State University. During a time of spiritual seeking, he attended many "plain" churches, including a variety of conservative Mennonite churches. Scott lived in the Amish and Mennonite community in Holmes County, Ohio, for a year. In 1969 he attended the Numidia Mennonit Bible School in Pennsylvania and the same year began two years of alternate service at Lancaster Mennonite High School in Pennsylvania. During this time, Scott joined the Old Order River Brethren Church, one of the consrvative Anababptist groups. In 1973 he married Harriet Sauder. While working as a researcher and writer for Good Books, he has written Plain Buggies, Why Do They Dress That Way?, The Amish Wedding and Other Special Occasions of the Old Order Communities, and Amish Houses and Barns. He is also the coauthor of Living Without Electricity.

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