The Mexican Nation: Historical Continuity and Modern Change

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Prentice Hall, 2002 - History - 418 pages
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The Continuity of Mexican History is an expansive presentation of the Mexican past within a basic chronological narrative. A straight forward, jargon-free compilation the book traces the nation's history from it indigenous roots through the 21st century and provides up-to-date information on the latest scholarly trends and findings. Written within a social and cultural context, this volume addresses race, religion and ethnicity, as well as economic analysis, artistic trends, women's issues and Mexico's relations with the world. The volume covers all aspects of Mexico's history including Mexico's indigenous roots, the Spanish invasion, Hispanic foundations, independence from Spain, the early Republic, war with the United States, Civil War and French intervention, the Era of Porfirio Díaz, industrialization and political Stability, migration and social change and stagnation and revival. For historians and those interested in Mexican history.

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Contents

The Aztec Hegemony
10
Defeat of the Aztecs
24
Society and Culture
35
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

DOUGLAS W. RICHMOND, an Associate Professor of History at the University of Arlington is also recognized as a scholar of Mexican History.

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