Linguĉ Anglicanĉ clavis, or, Rudiments of English grammar, ed. by C. Heycock (Google eBook)

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Page x - And out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto Adam to see what he would call them: and whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the name thereof.
Page xi - He did not thus begin the world with names, but with the power of naming : for man is not a mere speaking machine ; God did not teach him words, as one of us teaches a parrot from without ; but gave him a capacity, and then evoked the capacity which He gave. Here, as in everything else that concerns the primitive constitution, the great original institutes, of humanity, our best and truest lights are to be gotten from the study of the...
Page xix - ... indeed is Scandinavian, though he must borrow his ' countess' from the Norman,) 'chancellor/ 'treasurer/ 'palace/ 'castle/ 'hall,' 'dome/ and a multitude more. At the same time the one remarkable exception of...
Page xi - Yet this must not be taken to affirm that man started at the first furnished with a full-formed vocabulary of words, and as it were with his first dictionary and first grammar ready-made to his hands. He did not thus begin the world with names, but with the power of naming: for man is not a mere speaking machine ; God did not teach him words, as one of us teaches a parrot, from without; but gave him a capacity, and then evoked the capacity which He gave.
Page xx - Wamba, the Saxon jester in Ivanhoe, plays the philologer here), that the names of almost THE HISTORY IN WOEDS. all animals so long as they are alive, are thus Saxon, but when dressed and prepared for food become Norman — a fact indeed which we might have expected beforehand ; for the Saxon hind had the charge and...
Page 48 - In the first Person simply shall foretells ; In will a Threat, or else a Promise dwells. Shall, in the second and the third, does threat ; Will simply, then, foretells the future feat.
Page 169 - It is remarkable that in such instances, if the personal pronoun were used, it would be in the nominative case ; as, ' A greater king never reigned than he, that is, "•than he was.
Page xx - Thus ox, steer, cow are Saxon, but beef Norman; calf is Saxon, but veal Norman; sheep is Saxon, but mutton Norman; so it is severally with swine and pork, deer and venison, fowl and pullet.
Page 41 - Teach me to feel another's wo, To hide the fault I see : That mercy I to others show, That mercy show to me.
Page 139 - It is of the nature of both the articles to determine or limit the thing spoken of. A determines it to be one single thing of the kind, leaving it still uncertain which : the determines which it is, or of many, which they are. The...

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