A Yankee in Meiji Japan: The Crusading Journalist Edward H. House

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James L. Huffman
Rowman & Littlefield, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 309 pages
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This unique book introduces nineteenth-century Japan through the compelling life story of Boston journalist Edward H. House (1836-1901), America's first regular correspondent in Japan. House's accomplishments were breathtaking in variety: shaping the reputations of John Brown and Mark Twain, influencing American attitudes toward Asia, persuading Congress to return a massive indemnity to Japan, editing Tokyo's earliest English-language newspaper (Tokio Times), constructing a powerful case against imperialism, and introducing Western orchestral music to Japan. House's experiences also illustrated many of the era's key themes: Japan's use of public relations as a diplomatic tool, the contentious relations of the expatriate community, the role foreign advisors played in Japan's drive toward modernity, and the complicated nature of U.S.-Japan relations. The book captures the human drama of a special breed of early journalist. It recounts the bohemianism that made House and his friends (e.g., Walt Whitman, Artemus Ward) notorious. It narrates his tender, tortured relationship with Aoki Koto, a girl he adopted when she was on the verge of suicide. It shows a courageous struggle with gout, including 20 years in a wheelchair given to him by the powerful Okuma Shigenobu. And it details a deep friendship with Mark Twain, which eventually was destroyed by a dispute over The Prince and the Pauper. Twain's unpublished 50-page manuscript on the experience, Concerning the Scoundrel E. H. House, is introduced here for the first time. Meticulously researched, the book draws on House's voluminous writings and on hundreds of letters between House and major figures in both America and Japan, including Mark Twain, U.S. Grant, John Russell Young, Edmund Clarence Stedman, Okuma Shigenobu, and Inoue Kaoru. With its lively, accessible prose and seamless interweaving of the life of House with the history of the Meiji era, this book will be welcomed by students, scholars, and general readers interested in modern Japa
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Incident in Yokohama Harbor
5
The Prodigy 18361870
15
Japan to 1870 Dizzying Change
47
The Newcomer 18701873
59
Japan 18701875 Consolidating Power
75
Writing for Japan 18731876
85
Japan18761881 Growing Pains
107
A Change in Course 18801885
165
Japan 18851892 Imperial Constitutionalism
191
Interesting Times 18861892
201
Japan 18931901 Modernityand All That Meant
229
Evening Years 18921901
239
Epilogue
261
Bibliography
279
Index
297

The Tokio Times That Naughty Yankee Boy 18771880
117
Japan 18811885 The Outsiders
153
About the Author
309
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

James L. Huffman is H. Orth Hirt Professor of History at Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio.

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