A History of New York, from the Beginnimg of the World to the End of the Dutch Dynasty: Containing, Among Many Surprising and Curious Matters, the Unutterable Ponderings of Walter the Doubter, the Disasterous Projects of William the Testy, and the Chivalric Achievements of Peter the Headstrong. The Three Dutch Governors of New Amsterdam; Being the Only Authentic History of the Times that Hath Ever Been Published. In Two Volumes, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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C.S. Van Winkle, 1826 - New York (N.Y.)
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Page 164 - His face, that infallible index of the mind, presented a vast expanse, unfurrowed by any of those lines and angles which disfigure the human countenance with what is termed expression. Two small...
Page 162 - He conceived every subject on so grand a scale that he had not room in his head to turn it over and examine both sides of it.
Page 163 - He was exactly five feet six inches in height, and six feet five inches in circumference. His head was a perfect sphere, and of such stupendous dimensions, that dame Nature, with all her sex's ingenuity, would have been puzzled to construct a neck capable of supporting it; wherefore she wisely declined the attempt, and settled it firmly on the top of his back bone, just between the shoulders.
Page iv - District Clerk's Office. BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the seventh day of May, AD 1828, in the fifty-second year of the Independence of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SG Goodrich, of the said District, has deposited in this office the...
Page 190 - The parties broke up without noise and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages, that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave of them with a hearty smack at the door...
Page 187 - These fashionable parties were generally confined to the higher classes, or noblesse, that is to say, such as kept their own cows, and drove their own wagons. The company commonly assembled at three o'clock, and went away about six...
Page 189 - ... of smart young gentlemen, with no brains at all. On the contrary, the young ladies seated themselves demurely in their rush-bottomed chairs, and knit their own woollen stockings; nor ever opened their lips, excepting to say, yah...
Page 164 - ... was either elevated above, or tranquilly settled below, the cares and perplexities of this world. He had lived in it for years, without feeling the least curiosity to know whether the sun revolved round it, or it round the sun; and he had watched, for at least half a century, the smoke curling from his pipe to the ceiling, without once troubling his head with any of those numerous theories, by which a philosopher would have perplexed his brain, in accounting for its rising above the surrounding...
Page 192 - Bible, and wore pockets, ay, and that too of a goodly size, fashioned with patchwork into many curious devices, and ostentatiously worn on the outside. These, in fact, were convenient receptacles, where all good housewives carefully stored away such things as they wished to have at hand, by which means they often came to be incredibly...
Page 194 - ... cabbage. Certain it is, that in those days, the heart of a lover could not contain more than one lady at a time ; whereas the heart of a modern gallant has often room enough to accommodate half a dozen. The reason of which I conclude to be, that either the hearts of the gentlemen have grown larger, or the persons of the ladies smaller. This, however, is a question for physiologists to determine.