Thoughts, philosophical and medical, selected from the works of Francis Bacon, with an essay on his health and medical writings by J. Dowson (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1870
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 44 - ... the inquiry of truth, which is the love-making, or wooing of it; the knowledge of truth, which is the presence of it, and the belief of truth, which is the enjoying of it; is the sovereign good of human nature.
Page 43 - ... and seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of reason, to the benefit and use of men: as if there were sought in knowledge a couch whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit; or a terrace for a wandering and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect; or a tower of state for a proud mind to raise itself upon; or a fort or commanding ground for strife and contention; or a shop for profit or sale; and not a rich storehouse for the glory of the Creator and the relief...
Page 6 - I hold every man a debtor to his profession; from the which, as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves, by way of amends, to be a help and ornament thereunto.
Page 20 - I confess that I have as vast contemplative ends, as I have moderate civil ends : for I have taken all knowledge to be my province ; and if I could purge it of two sorts of rovers, whereof the one with frivolous disputations, confutations, and verbosities, the other with blind...
Page 67 - There is a wisdom in this beyond the rules of physic : a man's own observation, what he finds good of, and what he finds hurt of, is the best physic to preserve health...
Page 28 - The End of our Foundation is the knowledge of Causes, and secret motions of things'; and the enlarging of the bounds of Human Empire, to the effecting of all things possible.
Page 46 - The one flies from the senses and particulars to the most general axioms, and from these principles, the truth of which it takes for settled and immoveable, proceeds to judgment and to the discovery of middle axioms. And this way is now in fashion. The other derives axioms from the senses and particulars, rising by a gradual and unbroken ascent, so that it arrives at the most general axioms last of all. This is the true way, but as yet untried.
Page 52 - The human understanding is no dry light, but receives an infusion from the will and affections; whence proceed sciences which may be called "sciences as one would.
Page 50 - For the mind of man is far from the nature of a clear and equal glass, wherein the beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence ; nay, it is rather like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced.
Page 47 - For man is but the servant and interpreter of nature : what he does and what he knows is only what he has observed of nature's order in fact or in thought ; beyond this he knows nothing and can do nothing. For the chain of causes cannot by any force be loosqd or broken, nor can nature be commanded except by being obeyed.

Bibliographic information