Laying Ghosts to Rest: Dilemmas of the Transformation in South Africa

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Nb Pub Limited, 2008 - History - 341 pages
1 Review
Mamphela Ramphele, successful businesswoman and one of few outspoken black voices, offers both indictment and inspiration. In her new book she touches upon: the distrust between South Africa's people, incomplete reconciliation and violent crime, the failure of schools and the government's skills programs to educate South Africans, globalization and how South Africa is failing to fill its place in Africa and the world, the costs of Black Economic Empowerment and 'transformation' in the private sector and in government, problems of leadership in South Africa.

Despite her spirited criticisms of mistakes made, Dr Ramphele remains upbeat about what can be achieved. Her insights into the lingering insecurities of some black South Africans and the psychology behind many of the failures of government are completely fresh. With great empathy she helps us understand why we act the way we do. At the same time she urges South Africans to overcome their immaturities and aim for excellence. Her new book is a powerful call to action.

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Review: Laying Ghosts to Rest: Dilemmas of the Transformation in South Africa

User Review  - Adriaan Jansen - Goodreads

''Laying ghost to rest'' is a thoughtful book about the state of South Africa and its democracy 14 years after the end of apartheid. In this 2008 book, Mamphela Ramphele's love for her country and its ... Read full review

Review: Laying Ghosts to Rest: Dilemmas of the Transformation in South Africa

User Review  - Sisikelelwe Tshofela - Goodreads

interesting and insightful Read full review

Contents

A ghost story
7
The challenges of transformation
13
A miracle that never was living with
28
Copyright

14 other sections not shown

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About the author (2008)

Dr. MAMPHELA RAMPHELE, a medical doctor and ex-World Bank director, first rose to prominence as an activist and associate of Steve Biko. She served as Deputy Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cape Town and as a Director at the World Bank in Washington DC before returning to South Africa as Director of Corp Capital. As a newspaper columnist and political commentator, she is one of few steadfastly independent voices.

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