Soil survey of Buffalo County, Wisconsin, Issue 54 (Google eBook)

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Pub. by the state, 1917 - Soil surveys - 76 pages
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Page 75 - The local distribution of rainfall varies, however, from year to year, some sections receiving more rain one year, and other sections more in other years. The variation is caused largely by the movement of cyclonic storms. The average rainfall for the entire state during the driest year was 21.4 inches, and for the wettest year 37 inches. "Of equal importance, in agriculture, to the total rainfall, is its seasonal distribution, and in this respect Wisconsin is un• i This chapter has been taken...
Page 63 - The surface soil to a depth of 8 to 10 inches consists of a dark brown to black silty clay loam to silty clay.
Page 76 - Most of the rainfall occurs just preceding and during the period of plant growth, thus being received by the crop at the most effective time. Wisconsin receives during the growing season, April to September, inclusive, an average of 21 inches of precipitation, which is as much rain as that received during the same months by eastern Texas, Illinois, Ohio, or eastern New York. The small winter precipitation in Wisconsin, mostly in the form of snow, on the other hand, causes virtually no leaching of...
Page 42 - But it is exhausted with comparative readiness and the most important point in the management of all of these soils is to follow methods which will maintain and increase the organic matter. In the virgin condition these soils are but slightly acid as a rule, but with continued cropping the acidity increases and for the best growth of clover and especially alfalfa, liming is essential. This use of lime not only makes the soil more suitable for the growth of alfalfa and clover, but assists in preventing...
Page 5 - Loam. — Less than 20% clay, and less than 50% silt. Silt loam. — 'Less than 20% clay, and over 50% silt. Clay loam. — Between 20 and 30% clay, and over 50% silt. Silty clay loam. — Between 20 and 30% clay, and over 50% silt. Clay. — Over 30% clay.
Page 14 - ... for the growth of clover and alfalfa. To increase the organic matter and improve the waterholding capacity, green manuring crops may be used to supplement the stable manure. Where an acid condition exists in the surface, ground limestone should be applied. On the steeper slopes the surface should be kept covered with a growing crop as much of the time as possible, or permanent pastures may be established in such places. Intertilled crops should not be grown on the steep slopes. extensively. It...
Page 151 - On fairly well drained marsh land well decomposed good pasture can also be developed. The compacting of the soil resulting from the use of this land as pasture is also a great benefit to it. When peat land is placed under cultivation a heavy roller should be classed along with implements necessary to its successful management.
Page 93 - ... depends upon the size of the individual soil grains of which it is composed, and not upon its color, origin, topographic position, or agricultural value. SOIL CLASSES SOILS CONTAINING LESS THAN 20% SILT AND CLAY. Coarse sand. — Over 25% fine gravel and coarse sand, and less than 50% of any other grade of sand. Sand. — Over 25% fine gravel, coarse and medium sand, and less than 50% fine sand. Fine sand. — Over 50% fine sand, or less than 25% fine gravel, coarse and medium sand. Very fine...
Page 79 - The average date of the last killing frost in the spring at Wabasha is May 1 and at Whitehall May 6.
Page 72 - ... has been much slower on the sandy soils than on the heavier lands in the northern two-thirds of the county. Agriculture is more highly developed in the section around Mansfield than in any other part of the county although settlements were made in some of the sandy sections considerably earlier. Practically all the general farm crops now grown were produced in the early history of the county, but the relative importance of a number of crops has changed. Hay and oats have always been the most...