A treatise upon modern instrumentation and orchestration (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1858
1 Review
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 233 - ... and penetrating in the higher part and full and rich in the lower part of their compass. The Saxophones are six in number, the high, the soprano, the alto, the tenor, the baritone and the bass; they are played with a single reed and a clarinet mouthpiece, Saxotromba.
Page 244 - ... therein would be heard the plaints, the murmurs, the mysterious sounds of primeval forests; the clamours, the prayers, the songs of triumph or of mourning of a people with expansive soul, ardent heart, and fiery passions; its silence would inspire awe by its solemnity; and organizations the...
Page 246 - I do not mean to say by this that it is necessary to imitate the mathematical regularity of the metronome; all music so performed would become of freezing stiffness, and I even doubt whether it would be possible to observe so flat a uniformity during a certain number of bars. But the metronome is none the less excellent to consult in order to know the original time, and its chief alterations.
Page 253 - The moderato is their natural pace, and they recur to it as infallibly as would a pendulum after having been a moment hurried or slackened in its oscillations. These people are the born enemies of all characteristic music, and the greatest destroyers of style. May Fate preserve the orchestral conductor at any cost from their co-operation. Once, in a large town (which I will not name), there was to be performed behind the scenes a very simple chorus, written in , allegretto.
Page 255 - ... than those of the sopranos and contraltos, may come forth freely and be neither stifled nor intercepted. When the presence of the chorus-singers in front of the orchestra is not necessary, the conductor will take care to send them away; since this large number of human bodies injures the sonority of the instruments. A symphony, performed by an orchestra thus more or less stifled, loses much of its effect. There are yet other precautions, relative especially to the orchestra, which the conductor...
Page 243 - It would evidently be necessary to adopt a style of extraordinary breadth, each time the entire mass is put in action; reserving the delicate effects, the light and rapid movements, for small bands which the author could easily arrange, and make them discourse together in the midst of this musical multitude. Beside the radiant colours which this myriad of different tonequalities would give out at every moment, unheard-of harmonic effects would be deduced from them.
Page 25 - That is, in fact, the true female voice of the orchestra, a voice at once passionate and chaste, heart-rending, yet soft, which can weep, sigh, and lament, chant, pray, and muse, or burst forth into joyous accents, as none other can do. An imperceptible movement of the arm, an almost unconscious sentiment on the part of him who experiences it, producing...
Page 245 - Except in listening to great works already known and esteemed, intelligent hearers can hardly distinguish the true culprit, and allot to him his due share of blame; but the number of these is still so limited that their judgment has little weight; and the bad conductor in presence of the public who would pitilessly hiss a vocal accident of a good singer reigns, with all the calm of a bad conscience, in his baseness and inefficiency. Fortunately, I here attack an exception; for the malevolent...
Page 252 - ... behind the scenes, without accompaniment from the principal orchestra, another conductor is absolutely essential. If the orchestra accompany this portion, the first conductor, who hears the distant music, is then strictly bound to let himself be guided by the second, and to follow his time by ear. But if as frequently happens in modern music the sound of the chief orchestra hinders the conductor from hearing that which is being performed at a distance from him, the intervention of a special...
Page 256 - The action of the arm necessary for producing a true tremolo, demands, doubtless, too great an effort. This idleness is intolerable. Many double-bass players permit themselves from idleness, also, or from a dread of being unable to achieve certain difficulties to simplify their part. This race of simplifiera, be it said, has existed for forty years ; but it cannot endure any longer.

Bibliographic information