Interpretive Archaeology: A Reader

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Julian Thomas
A&C Black, 2000 - Social Science - 622 pages
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New forms of archaeology are emerging which position the discipline firmly within the social and cultural sciences. These approaches have been described as "post processual" or "interpretive" archaeology, and draw on a range of traditions of enquiry in the humanities, from Marxism and critical theory to hermeneutics, feminism, queer theory, phenomenology and post-colonial thinking. This volume gathers together a series of the canonical statements which have defined an interpretive archaeology. Many of these have been unavailable for some while, and others are drawn from inaccessible publications. In addition, a number of key articles are included which are drawn from other disciplines, but which have been influential and widely cited within archaeology. The collection is put into context by an editorial introduction and thematic notes for each section.>
  

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Contents

Introduction
21
INTERPRETATION INFERENCE EPISTEMOLOGY
81
SOCIAL RELATIONS POWER AND IDEOLOGY
197
Introduction
281
Engendered places in prehistory RUTH TRINGHAM
329
Introduction
361
Material metaphor social interaction and historical
398
Introduction
429
Introduction
491
architecture and spatial
541
Bibliography
561
Index
619
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About the author (2000)

Julian Thomas is professor of archaeology at the Univeristy of Manchester.

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