A green journey

Front Cover
Morrow, 1985 - Fiction - 282 pages
26 Reviews
" Hassler's characters have old-fashioned values and typical human failings; they make this a novel to restore your faith in humanity." LOS ANGELES TIMESAgatha McGee is following a dream, though it might be late in the game. She's just retired from a career of teaching and travels to Ireland in search of the romance she never had time for. And along the way, she not only discovers people she would never have let herself know before, but learns through experience, at long last, that love is unpredictable, unstoppable, and never appears as we dream it will. "From the Paperback edition."

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Review: A Green Journey

User Review  - Ann - Goodreads

great characterization. looking forward to reading more by Hassler, an author I did not know Read full review

Review: A Green Journey

User Review  - Paula - Goodreads

nice Read full review

Contents

Section 1
13
Section 2
19
Section 3
25
Copyright

23 other sections not shown

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About the author (1985)

Author Jon Hassler was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota on March 30, 1933. He received his bachelor's degree from St. John's University in 1955 before going on to the University of North Dakota for his master's degree. After graduating from college, he taught high school English for the next 10 years. In 1970, while teaching at Brainerd Community College, he became interested in writing fictional stories. Hassler's first novel, Staggerford, a story of a small-town school teacher, was chosen Novel of the Year in 1978 by the Friends of American Writers. In 1987, Hassler's fifth novel, Grand Opening, a tale told from the point of view of a twelve-year-old boy living in the corrupt town of Plainview, Minnesota, won the Best Fiction Award, given by the Society of Midland Authors. Granted honorary Doctor of Letters degrees by Assumption College, the University of North Dakota, and the University of Notre Dame, he has also received fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and the Minnesota State Arts Board. He died, after years of suffering from progressive supranuclear palsy, on March 20, 2008.

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