Treating Troubled Children and Their Families

Front Cover
Guilford Press, 2004 - Psychology - 303 pages
1 Review
Integrating systemic, psychodynamic, and cognitive-behavioral perspectives, this acclaimed book presents an innovative framework for therapeutic work. Ellen Wachtel shows how parents and children all too often get entangled in patterns that cause grief to both generations, and demonstrates how to help bring about change with a combination of family-focused and child-focused interventions. Vivid case examples illustrate creative ways to engage young children in family sessions and conduct complementary sessions with children and parents alone, using a variety of strengths-based, developmentally informed strategies. The paperback edition features a new preface in which the author reflects on the continuing evolution of her approach.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Treating Troubled Children and Their Families

User Review  - Kate - Goodreads

Fantastic! What a clear, well-written book on how to integrate systemic and psychodynamic conceptualizations of children and their families in order to create tailor-made, effective and integrative interventions. Read full review

Related books

Contents

THE CHILD AS AN INDIVIDUAL AN INTRODUCTION TO CHILDINFAMILY THERAPY
1
The Exclusion of Children from Family Therapy
3
A Review of Systemic Hypotheses
4
Going Beyond Symptom Relief
7
An Integrative Approach
12
The Idea of the Individual
13
Cyclical Psychodynamics
15
Borrowing from Other Modalities
17
Insufficiently Developed Defense Mechanisms
124
Understanding the Behavioral and Systemic Components of Insufficiently Developed Defense and Coping Mechanisms
126
The Childs Defenses and the Family System
130
A Word about an Integrative Perspective and Specificity
132
Essential Psychodynamic Concepts
134
Frightening or Denied Aspects of the Self
135
Deprivation Frustration and Abandonment
139
Overgratification as a Source of Rage and Feelings of Deprivation
142

A Preliminary Look at the Integrative Model
18
MEETING WITH PARENTS ALONE UNDERSTANDING THEIR CONCERNS
20
Establishing a Collaborative Relationship
22
Parental Guilt
23
Assessing the Attitude toward the Symptom and Its Place in the System
24
The Parents Explanations of the Problem
26
Gathering Information for Systemic Psychodynamic and Behavioral Hypotheses
30
Information about Interactions with Teachers Babysitters and Other Significant Adults
32
Using Questions Regarding Temperament as a Source of Systemic Information
34
Attention Deficit Disorder Hyperactivity and Learning Disabilities
38
Broadening the Focus
39
Summary
40
GETTING THE MOST OUT OF FAMILY MEETINGS
42
The First Meeting with the Family
43
Including Siblings
44
The Tone of the First Session
45
Activities for Family Sessions
47
Observing Systemic Interactions
52
Values and Attitudes
58
Focusing on the Childrens Reactivity Openness and Methods of Coping with Stress
59
Feedback Meeting with Parents
61
Family Meetings as Part of the Ongoing Work
64
Using Family Sessions for Problem Solving
66
Working on Boundaries and Alliance
67
Establishing Rules for Communication when Parents Are Divorced
69
Overall Dynamics of the Family System
70
KNOWING THE CHILD IN DEPTH A CLINICAL GUIDE TO EFFECTIVE INDIVIDUAL SESSIONS
73
The Purpose of Meeting Alone with the Child
74
Differentiating These Meetings from Psychodynamic Play Therapy
75
A Word about Confidentiality
79
The First Meeting
81
From Facts to Feelings
83
When the Child Seems Seriously Depressed or Is Behavior Bizarrely
87
Playing Telling Stories and Drawing
91
Feeling Board Games
92
Telling Stories
95
The Childs Reactions to His Story
99
A Word about Telling Stories
100
Using Clay
102
Drawing
103
Dealing with the Childs Hostility
106
Anxiety Adaptation Styles and Defense Mechanisms
108
Adaptational Styles
109
Defense Mechanisms
112
When Defenses and Coping Strategies are Maladaptive
119
Understanding The Behavioral and Systemic Reinforcements
121
Understanding Hostile and Aggressive Children
143
Overly Anxious and Dependent Children
147
The More Seriously Disturbed Child
151
Interpersonal Expectancies
154
INTERVENTIONS BASED ON PSYCHODYNAMIC FORMULATIONS
157
Playing Baby
158
The StoryTelling Technique
164
RealLife Stories
165
Telling Stories and the Alteration of the Family Structure
166
Telling Stories and the Alteration of the Family Structure
167
Utilizing Prewritten Stories
169
Positive Reminiscing
171
Using Psychodynamic Understanding to Inform Systemic and Behavioral Interventions
172
Limit Setting to Address the Childs Fear of his Anger
173
Limiting the Expression of Negative Feelings
174
Avoiding Overstimulation of Regressive Urges
175
The Childs Fears
178
Psychodynamically Based Reassurances
180
Recognizing a Childs Unarticulated Need for More Attention
181
Relaxing with Children
182
Understanding the Childs Need to Have Some Control Over the Parents Availability
183
A Word About the Childs Needs For Autonomy and Mastery
184
Working Collaboratively
187
Using Psychodynamic Formulations in Individual Sessions with a Child
189
Neutralizing the Discussion of Forbidden Material
191
Addressing Unconscious Conflicts and Anxieties Through Metaphoric Stories
194
Interventions Based on Behavioral Formulations
198
An Analysis of reinforcement Contingencies
202
Utilizing Principles of Behavior Modification
210
Time Out
218
Penalties Punishment and Disapproval
220
CognitiveBehavioral Approaches and Social Skills Training
221
Utilizing Cognitive Methods Modeling and Role Playing
223
Summary
232
PULLING IT ALL TOGETHER FIVE ILLUSTRATIVE
233
A Depressed Child
235
A Child Who Hated School
244
An Encropretic 10YearOld
252
A Child Who Hated Herself
259
A Boy With a Dangerous Temper
267
Conclusion
282
Notes
283
References
287
Index
297
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Relational Child Psychotherapy

Limited preview - 2010
All Book Search results »

About the author (2004)

Ellen F. Wachtel, JD, PhD, has taught and supervised individual and family therapy in the doctoral programs at New York University and the City University of New York, as well as at Roosevelt Hospital and the Ackerman Institute for the Family. She maintains a private practice in New York City.

Bibliographic information