Seldens of Virginia and Allied Families, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Frank Allaben Genealogical Company, 1911
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This book claims my 7X great grandfather, Richard Ball (1645-1677) died in infancy in England. I don't think I would trust it as factual.

Contents

I
19
II
149
III
165
IV
225
V
235
VI
247
VII
293
VIII
317
XVI
499
XVII
511
XVIII
553
XIX
569
XX
575
XXI
585
XXII
589
XXIII
595

IX
343
X
369
XI
437
XII
451
XIII
463
XIV
469
XV
481
XXIV
619
XXV
631
XXVI
637
XXVII
657
XXVIII
663
XXIX
687

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Popular passages

Page 491 - That religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence ; and, therefore, all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience ; and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love and charity towards each other.
Page 491 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot by any compact deprive or divest their posterity ; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, •with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 182 - Armistead and the heirs of his body, and in default of such issue to the...
Page 491 - That all power is vested in, and consequently derived from, the people; that magistrates are their trustees and servants, and at all times amenable to them.
Page 491 - That elections of members to serve as representatives of the people, in assembly, ought to be free; and that all men, having sufficient evidence of permanent common interest with, and attachment to, the community, have the right of suffrage...
Page 337 - ... He was a foe without hate; a friend without treachery; a soldier without cruelty; a victor without oppression; and a victim without murmuring. He was a public officer without vices; a private citizen without wrong; a neighbor without reproach; a Christian without hypocrisy; and a man without guile. He was Caesar without his ambition; Frederick without his tyranny; Napoleon without his selfishness; and Washington without his reward.
Page 491 - That a well-regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trained to arms, is the proper, natural, and safe defence of a free State; that standing armies, in time of peace, should be avoided, as dangerous to liberty ; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.
Page 492 - That no free government, or the blessings of liberty, can be preserved to any people but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, frugality, and virtue, and by frequent recurrence to fundamental principles.
Page 412 - The chamber where the good man meets his fate Is privileged beyond the common walk Of virtuous life, quite in the verge of Heaven.
Page 151 - Arms: Argent, a lion passant, sable; on a chief of the second, three mullets of the first. Crest: Out of the clouds proper, a demi-lion, rampant, sable, powdered with estoiles, argent, holding a globe, or.

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