Thirteen Ways to Sink a Sub (Google eBook)

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Marshall Cavendish, Aug 1, 2009 - Juvenile Fiction - 115 pages
11 Reviews
Hobie Hanson and the rest of his fourth-grade class can't believe their luck: Mr. Star, their teacher who never gets sick, is not in school. That means they're getting a SUB. That means it's time for their class to have some FUN. It's boys against-girls in the fight to see who can sink the sub faster—and what starts with simple name-changing leads to an all-out flood in the classroom!
  

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Review: Thirteen Ways to Sink a Sub

User Review  - Brick Andreasen - Goodreads

A substitute teacher means only one thing for Hobie's class: it's time to sink her. Getting a sub to cry is their ultimate aspiration, and when their regular teacher gets sick with the flu, they get a ... Read full review

Review: Thirteen Ways to Sink a Sub

User Review  - Jennifer - Goodreads

Summary: Hobie is a fourth grader. He goes to school one day to find that his teacher is out sick and they have a substitute. This sub tells the students a secret, it's her very first time being a ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

PIT BALL
1
SPIES OF THE PURPLE CAVE
11
THE TING TANG SHOW
16
SVETLANA IVANOVITCH
29
IVE GOT AN ITCH
45
HAVE A NICE DAY
58
THE FANGED FACE
70
YOURS TILL NIAGARA FALLS
78
FAIRS FAIR
89
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Children's author Jamie Gilson was born in Beardstown, Illinois on July 4, 1933. She received her B.A. from the Northwestern University School of Speech after starting out her education at the University if Missouri. Before becoming an author, she was a teacher, a staff writer and producer for the Chicago Board of Education radio station, a writer of Encyclopaedia Brittanica films, and was a monthly columnist for Chicago magazine. She wrote commercials for radio station WFMT in Chicago as well as writing film and film strips for Encyclopedia Britannica Films. Most of her novels are humorous contemporary works set in Illinois. She draws on her own childhood as well as visits to local schools for book ideas. As a child, she lived in Pittsfield, Illinois for a few years which later became the setting for two of her novels. Her book Wagon Train 911 was based on her experience of spending two weeks with an entire fifth grade class while they studied the Western Movement using total immersion. The students took pioneer identities, joined a wagon train, and made decisions concerning their trip. Her books have won numerous awards including the 2005 Prairie State Award for Excellence in Writing for Children presented by the Illinois Reading Council. Two of her books, Thirteen Ways to Sink a Sub and Do Bananas Chew Gum?, have won state child-voted awards from Florida, Ohio, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Arkansas.

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