Flora Cestrica: An Herborizing Companion for the Young Botanists of Chester County, State of Pennsylvania (Google eBook)

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Lindsay & Blakiston, 1853 - Botany - 498 pages
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Page 71 - Yet nature is made better by no mean But nature makes that mean : so, over that art Which you say adds to nature, is an art That nature makes. You see, sweet maid, we marry A gentler scion to the wildest stock, And make conceive a bark of baser kind By bud of nobler race : this is an art Which does mend nature, change it rather, but The art itself is nature.
Page 146 - Harry, I do not only marvel where thou spendest thy time, but also how thou art accompanied : for though: the camomile, the more it is trodden on, the faster it grows...
Page 171 - The beauties of the wilderness are his, That make so gay the solitary place Where no eye sees them. And the fairer forms That cultivation glories in, are his. He sets the bright procession on its way, And marshals all the order of the year. He marks the bounds which winter may not pass, And blunts his pointed fury. In its case Russet and rude, folds up the tender germ Uninjured, with inimitable art, And ere one flowery season fades and dies Designs the blooming wonders of the next.
Page xxxiv - ... particulars in which the plants it embraces agree among themselves, and differ from other groups of the same rank. This complete analysis being carried through the system, from the primary divisions down to the species, it is evident that the study of a single plant of each group will give a correct general idea of the structure, habits, and even the sensible properties, of the whole.
Page 9 - The wood of this magnificent tree is highly valued in many branches of the mechanic art, — especially the variety called yellow poplar, which is generally to be known by its thicker and more deeply furrowed bark. The bark of the root, and young tree, is a good aromatic bitter. "Many people," says KALM, "believe its roots to be as efficacious against the fever as the Jesuit's Bark.
Page 111 - good old times," when that description of females had a practical existence in the community. The bark is an excellent tonic, — almost rivaling the Cinchona, in efficacy. A century since, according to KALM, there was so much faith in the virtues of the Dogwood, that "when the cattle fall down in spring, for want of strength, the people tie a branch of this tree on their neck, thinking it will help them!
Page xxix - The sages say, Dame Truth delights to dwell, Strange mansion ! in the bottom of a well, Questions are then the windlass and the rope That pull the grave old gentlewoman up...
Page 90 - CIRCAEA prints her tread. And chaunts the numbers which disturb the dead; Shakes o'er the holy earth her sable plume. Waves her dread wand, and strikes the echoing tomb! — Pale shoot the stars across the troubled night, The timorous moon withholds her conscious light; Shrill scream the famish'd bats, and shivering owls, And loud and long the dog of midnight howls! — — Then yawns the bursting ground! — two...
Page 280 - By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof. For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song ; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion.
Page 170 - The grand transition, that there lives and works A soul in all things, and that soul is God. The beauties of the wilderness are his, That make so gay the solitary place Where no eye sees them. And the fairer forms That cultivation glories in are his. He sets the bright procession on its way, And marshals all the order of the year; He marks the bounds which winter may not pass, And blunts his pointed fury; in its case, Russet and rude, folds up the tender germ...

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