Nature, Volume 33 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Sir Norman Lockyer
Macmillan Journals Limited, 1886 - Electronic journals
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Page 307 - Yet I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, And the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.
Page 51 - Carll. A TREATISE ON THE CALCULUS OF VARIATIONS. Arranged with the purpose of Introducing, as well as Illustrating, its Principles to the Reader by means of Problems, and Designed to present in all Important Particulars a Complete View of the Present State of the Science.
Page 200 - The few sounds of birds are of that pensive or mysterious character which intensifies the feeling of solitude rather than imparts a sense of life and cheerfulness. Sometimes, in the midst of the stillness, a sudden yell or scream will startle one ; this comes from some defenceless fruit-eating animal, which is pounced upon by a tiger-cat or stealthy boa-constrictor. Morning and evening the howling monkeys make a most fearful and harrowing noise, under which it...
Page 296 - I know of scarcely anything so apt to impress the imagination as the wonderful form of cosmic order expressed by the " Law of Frequency of Error". The law would have been personified by the Greeks and deified, if they had known of it. It reigns with serenity and in complete self-effacement amidst the wildest confusion. The huger the mob, and the greater the apparent anarchy, the more perfect is its sway. It is the supreme...
Page 117 - It looks as if the scientific, like other revolutions, meant to devour its own children ; as if the growth of science tended to overwhelm its votaries ; as if the man of science of the future were condemned to diminish into a narrower and narrower specialist as time goes on.
Page 70 - Palaeontology or the Geographical Distribution of Plants. In Zoology and Comparative Anatomy minor details will not be included in the questions relating to classification. Geographical distribution of animals is held to be a part of Zoology, and Comparative Anatomy includes the structure of extinct as well as of recent forms. Human Anatomy will include the mechanism of the human body, the comparison of its parts with those of lower animals, its development, &c. ; but the questions will be of a simple...
Page 46 - Dinah, my spaniel, equally embarrassed on the other. She was overlooking half a dozen of her new-born puppies, which had been removed two or three times from her, and her anxiety was excessive, as she tried to find out if they were all present, or if any were still missing. She kept puzzling and running her eyes over them backwards and forwards, but could not satisfy herself. She evidently had a vague notion of counting, but the figure was too large for her brain. Taking the two as they stood, dog...
Page 282 - the illustrious Charles had begun to reign alone in the western parts of the world, and the study of letters was everywhere well-nigh forgotten, in such sort that the worship of the true God declined, it chanced that two Scots from Ireland lighted with the British merchants on the coast of Gaul, men learned without compare, as well in secular as in sacred writings ; who, since they...
Page 166 - ... movement which it exhibits after development has commenced. The evidence before us does not support the view that the ovum of Millepora formerly contained much yolk, and has subsequently lost it. Physical Society, November 26. Dr. Balfour Stewart, President, in the chair. Mr. Asutosh Makhopadhyay was elected a member of the Society. The following communications were read : On the analogies of influence-machines and dynamos, by Prof. SP Thompson. The author pointed out that in...
Page 200 - Bien te veo" (I see you well), and accordingly have given it this name. A mocking-bird (Mimus orpheus), called by the inhabitants Calandria, is remarkable, from possessing a song far superior to that of any other bird in the country: indeed, it is nearly the only bird in South America which I have observed to take its stand for the purpose of singing.

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