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" Shakespeare has no heroes; his scenes are occupied only by men who act and speak as the reader thinks that he should himself have spoken or acted on the same occasion: even where the agency is supernatural, the dialogue is level with life. "
The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare - Page 64
by William Shakespeare, James Boswell, Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson, Edward Capell, George Steevens, Richard Farmer, Nicholas Rowe - 1821
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Mr. Johnson's Preface to His Edition of Shakespear's Plays

Samuel Johnson - 1765 - 72 pages
...level with life. Other writers difguife the moft natural pafiions and moft frequent incidents ; fo that he who contemplates them in the book will not know them in the world : Shakefpeare approximates the remote, and familiarizes t^ie wonderful ; the event which he reprefcnts...
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The Monthly Review, Or, Literary Journal, Volume 33

Ralph Griffiths, G. E. Griffiths - English imprints - 1765
...level with life. Other writers difguife the moft natural pafilons and moft frequent incidents ; fo that he who contemplates them in the book will not know them in the world : Shakefpeare approximates the remote, and familiarizes the won*derful ; the event which he reprefents...
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Annual Register, Volume 8

Edmund Burke - History - 1766
...is level with life. Other writers difguife the molt natural paffions and mod frequent incidents ; fo that he who contemplates them in the book, will not know them in world : Shakefpeare approximates the remote, and familiarizes the wonderful ; the event which he reprefents...
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The plays of William Shakespeare, with the corrections and illustr. of ...

William Shakespeare - 1768
...is level with life. Other writers difguife the mod natural paffions and moft frequent incidents ; fo that he who contemplates them in the book will not know them in the world : Sbakefpeare approximates the remote, and familiarizes the wonderful ; the event which he reprefents...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Prefaces. Tempest. Two gentlemen of Verona ...

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - Drama - 1773
...level with life. Other writers difguife the mofl natural paffions and mofl frequent incidents ; fo that he who contemplates them in the book will not know them in the world: Shakefpeare approximates the remote, and familiarizes the wonderful; the event which he reprefents...
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Miscellaneous and Fugitive Pieces, Volume 2

Samuel Johnson, Thomas Davies - 1774
...level with Life. Other Writers difguife the moft natural Paflions and moft frequent Incidents ; fo that he who contemplates them in the Book will not know them in the World : Shakefpeare approximates the Remote, and familiarizes the Wonderful ; the Event which he reprefents...
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Miscellaneous and fugitive pieces [chiefly of Johnson, ed. by T. Davies].

Samuel Johnson - 1774
...level with Life. Other Writers difguife the moil natural Paffions and moft frequent Incidents ; fo that he who contemplates them in the Book will not know them in the World : Shakefpeare approximates the Remote, and familiarizes the Wonderful ; the Event which he reprefents...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare in Ten Volumes: Prefaces. The tempest. The ...

William Shakespeare - 1778 - 630 pages
...level with life. Other writers difguife the moft natural paffions and moft frequent incidents ; fo that he who contemplates them in the book will not know them in the world: Shafceipeare approximates the remote, and familiarizes the wonderful ; the event which he reprefents...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: The Adventurer. Philological tracts

Samuel Johnson, Sir John Hawkins - English literature - 1787
...level with life. Other writers difguife the moft natural paflions and moft frequent incidents ; fo that he who contemplates them in the book will not know them in the world : Sbakefpeare approximates the remote, and familiarizes the wonderful; the event which he reprefents...
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Dramatic Writings of Will. Shakespeare

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, John Bell, George Steevens - 1788
...Shakspere has no heroes ; his scenes are occupied only by men, who act and speak as the reader thinks that he should himself have spoken or acted on the...contemplates them in the book will not know them in the world : Shakspere approximates the remote, and familiarizes the wonderful ; the event which he represents...
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