Shakespeare and the Rival Poet: Displaying Shakespeare as a Satirist and Proving the Identity of the Patron and the Rival of the Sonnets (Google eBook)

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John Lane, 1903 - 360 pages
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Page 22 - My mistress eyes are nothing like the sun ; Coral is far more red than her lips' red ; If snow be white why then her breasts are dun ; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on h'er head. I have seen roses...
Page 88 - But love, first learned in a lady's eyes, Lives not alone immured in the brain, But, with the motion of all elements, Courses as swift as thought in every power, And gives to every power a double power, Above their functions and their offices.
Page 59 - When in the chronicle of wasted time I see descriptions of the fairest wights, And beauty making beautiful old rhyme, In praise of ladies dead, and lovely knights, Then, in the blazon of sweet beauty's best, Of hand, of foot, of lip, of eye, of brow, I see their antique pen would have expressed Even such a beauty as you master now.
Page 51 - THE love I dedicate to your Lordship is without end; whereof this pamphlet, without beginning, is but a superfluous moiety. The warrant I have of your honourable disposition, not the worth of my untutored lines, makes it assured of acceptance. What I have done is yours, what I have to do is yours ; being part in all I have, devoted yours.
Page 156 - Was it the proud full sail of his great verse, Bound for the prize of all too precious you, That did my ripe thoughts in my brain inhearse, Making their tomb the womb wherein they grew ? Was it his spirit, by spirits taught to write Above a mortal pitch, that struck me dead ? No, neither he, nor his compeers by night Giving him aid, my verse astonished.
Page viii - Euripides, and Sophocles to us; Pacuvius, Accius, him of Cordova dead, To life again, to hear thy buskin tread, And shake a stage; or, when thy socks were on, Leave thee alone for the comparison Of all that insolent Greece or haughty Rome Sent forth, or since did from their ashes come.
Page 60 - And the sad augurs mock their own presage ; Incertainties now crown themselves assured And peace proclaims olives of endless age. Now with the drops of this most balmy time My love looks fresh, and Death to me subscribes, Since, spite of him, I '11 live in this poor rhyme, "While he insults o'er dull and speechless tribes : And thou in this shalt find thy monument, When tyrants' crests and tombs of brass are spent CVIII.
Page 89 - Subtle as sphinx ; as sweet, and musical, As bright Apollo's lute, strung with his hair, And, when love speaks, the voice of all the gods Makes heaven drowsy with the harmony. Never durst poet touch a pen to write, Until his ink were temper'd with love's sighs ; O, then his lines would ravish savage ears, And plant in tyrants mild humility.
Page 131 - The other turns to a mirth-moving jest, Which his fair tongue, conceit's expositor, Delivers in such apt and gracious words That aged ears play truant at his tales And younger hearings are quite ravished ; So sweet and voluble is his discourse.
Page 83 - Th' endeavour of this present breath may buy That honour, which shall bate his scythe's keen edge, And make us heirs of all eternity. Therefore, brave conquerors ! — for so you are, That war against your own affections, And the huge army of the world's desires...

References from web pages

§2. Shakespeare and the “Rival Poet”. II. Chapman, Marston, Dekker ...
Vol. 6. The Drama to 1642, Part Two. The Cambridge History of English and American Literature: An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes. 1907–21
www.bartleby.com/ 216/ 0202.html

Shakespeare and the Rival Poet
This Figure, that thou here seest put,. It was for gentle Shakespeare cut;. Wherein the Graver had a strife. With Nature, to out-doe the Life: ...
members.fortunecity.com/ flopezr/ html/ english/ books/ shakriva.htm

JSTOR: Shakespeare and Chapman
Shakespeare and Chapman. H. Dugdale Sykes. The Modern Language Review, Vol. 13, No. 2, 244-250. Apr., 1918. Shakespeare and Chapman. By jm ROBERTSON. ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0026-7937(191804)13%3A2%3C244%3ASAC%3E2.0.CO%3B2-J

Shakespeare and the school of night: An estimate and further ...
Schrickx. 35. Shakespeare and. the School. SHAKESPEARE AND THE SCHOOL OF NIGHT: AN ESTIMATE. AND FURTHER INTERPRETATIONS. The accuracy of the literary texts ...
www.springerlink.com/ index/ QK48726183266212.pdf

The Project Gutenberg ebook of Bussy D'Ambois and The Revenge of ...
The Project Gutenberg ebook of Bussy D'Ambois and The Revenge of Bussy D'Ambois, by George Chapman This ebook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost ...
www.gutenberg.org/ files/ 20890/ 20890-h/ 20890-h.htm

A Golden Book, bound richly up Oxford is Shakespeare: any questions?
Vol.1:no.1. Fall 2001. "Let me not to the marriage of true minds admit impediments..." (Continued on page 12). (Continued on page 3) ...
www.shakespearefellowship.org/ Newsletter/ SM1.1z4a.pdf

Acheson Arthur | English Bookstore in Czech Republic
Shakespeare's Lost Years In London 1586-1592 (1920); Shakespeare's Sonnet Story 1592-1598; Shakespeare And The Rival Poet; Shakespeare And The Rival Poet: ...
www.bookfayre.cz/ books/ name/ arthur_acheson.1189318.html.cs

Libros & Books | Resultados de Búsqueda
Shakespeare and the Rival Poet: Displaying Shakespeare as a Satirist and Proving the Identity of the Patron and the Rival of the Sonnets Acheson, Arthur ...
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