European agriculture and rural economy from personal observation (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Printed by J. Rogerson, 1844 - Agriculture
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Contents

Progress of Agriculture compared with other Pursuits
144
Actual Improvements in English Agriculture
148
Live Stock and Vegetables
150
Application of Steam to Agriculture
151
Increased Production
159
Royal Agricultural Society
160
Agricultural Society of Scotland
166
Relation of Landlord and Tenant
167
XXL Game and the Game Laws
173
The Royal Agricultural Society of Ireland
175
Model Farm and Agricultural School
179
Dublin Botanical Garden
186
THIRD REPORT XXV Agricultural Education
189
Glasnevin Agricultural School
196
Templemoyle Agricultural School
203
Brookfield Agricultural School
212
Larne School
216
School at Ealing
218
Agricultural College at Cirencester
219
General Views of Agricultural Education
220
Influence of Knowledge upon Agriculture
223
Sciences to be taught
225
Chemical Science
226
Analysis of Soils
228
Soils of Heaths
229
Natural Science
237
XXXIL Model Farm
239
Experimental Farm
240
Plan of an Agricultural Institution for the United States
244
Elevation of Agriculture as a Pursuit and a Profession
248
Rural Manners in England
251
A Pencil Sketch
252
Life in the Country
256
Veterinary College
257
Museum of Economic Geology
263
XL1I Chemical Agricultural Association in Scotland
265
Chemical Agricultural Lectures
267
Employment of Agriculturists
268
Guano
270
FOURTH REPORT XLVI General Considerations
285
Agriculture as a Commercial Pursuit
294
Markets Cattle Markets
297
Falkirk Tryst
299
The Ballinasloe Fair
300
The Galway Fair
301
The Galway Women
303
Smithfield London
304
Forms of Business in Smithfield
306

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Page 484 - Not here alone does bro" therly love fulfil that saying, ' if one member suffer, " all the members suffer with it, and if one member " be honoured, all the members rejoice with it.
Page 135 - To provide for us in our necessities is not in the power of government. It would be a vain presumption in statesmen to think they can do it. The people maintain them, and not they the people. It is in the power of government to prevent much evil ; it can do very little positive good in this, or perhaps in anything else.
Page 31 - When a man asks me, what is the use of shrubs and flowers, my first impulse is always, to look under his hat and see the length of his ears. I am heartily sick of measuring everything by a standard of mere utility and profit; and as heartily do I pity the man, who can see no good in life but in the pecuniary gain, or in the mere animal indulgences of eating and drinking." Colmari's Agricultural Tour.
Page 493 - For in all things whatever, the mind is the most valuable and the most important; and in this scale the whole of agriculture is in a natural and just order ; the beast is as an informing principle to the plough and cart ; the laborer is as reason to the beast; and the farmer is as a thinking and presiding principle to the laborer.
Page 464 - Commons, to which the numerous petitions complaining of agricultural distress were referred in 1821, it will be seen that at that time almost the only grain produced in the fens of Cambridgeshire consisted of oats. Since then, by draining and manuring, the capability of the soil has been so changed that these fens now produce some of the finest wheat that is grown in England; and this more costly grain now constitutes the main dependence of the farmers in a district where, fourteen years ago, its...
Page 451 - ... so hard, that with difficulty could a pickaxe be made to enter in many places ; and my bailiff, who had looked after the lands for 35 years, told me that the lands were not worth...
Page 414 - This fertility is owing to the alkalies which are contained in the lava, and which by exposure to the weather are rendered capable of being absorbed by plants. Thousands of years have been necessary to convert stones and rocks into the soil of arable land, and thousands of years more will be requisite for their perfect reduction, that is, for the complete exhaustion of their alkalies.
Page 131 - I felt satisfied that, by trenching with the spade, the land would derive all the advantage of a summer fallowing, and avoid all the disadvantages attending it, I determined on trenching thirty-four acres of my fallow-break Immediately on the crop being removed from the ground, and had it sown with wheat by the middle of November, 1832. I may here remark that I did not apply any manure, as I thought the former crop was injured by being too bulky. As it is now...
Page 453 - Turnips must have a deep and well-pulverized soil, in order to enable them to swell, and the taproots to penetrate in search of food. The tap-root of a Swedish turnip has been known to penetrate 39 inches into the ground. I will add only two or three general observations. " 1st. The work done by the plough far exceeds trenching with the spade, as the plough only breaks and loosens the land all around, without turning the subsoil to the top, which, in some cases, (where the subsoil is bad,) would...
Page 25 - Park, 66 acres ; St. James's Park, 87 acres ; Regent's Park, 372 acres ; terraces and canals connected with Regent's Park, 80 acres making a grand total of 1202 acres. To these should be added the large, elegant, and highly embellished public squares in various parts of London, and even in the most crowded parts of the old city, which, in all, probably exceed 100 acres.

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