Remarks of the Hon. Peleg Sprague at Faneuil Hall: before the citizens of Boston and its vicinity, upon the character and services of Gen. William Henry Harrison, of Ohio, the Whig candidate for the presidency of the United States (Google eBook)

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J.H. Eastburn, printer, 1839 - Presidents - 20 pages
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Page 7 - Resolved, That in the late campaign against the Indians on the Wabash, Governor WH HARRISON has, in the opinion of this legislature, behaved like a hero, a patriot and a general ; and that for his cool, deliberate, skilful, and gallant conduct in the late battle of Tippecanoe, he deserves the warmest thanks of the nation.
Page 9 - But it will be such as is bestowed upon the passing meteor, whose blaze is no longer remembered, when it is no longer seen. To be esteemed eminently great, it is necessary to be eminently good. The qualities of the hero and the general must be devoted to the advantage of mankind, before he will be permitted to assume the title of their benefactor ; and the station which he will hold in their regard and affections will depend, not upon the number and the splendor of his victories ; but upon the results...
Page 8 - With these objects in view, you will command such means as may be practicable, exercise your own discretion, and act in all cases according to your own judgment.
Page 9 - ... but upon the results and the use he may make of the influence he acquires from them. " If the fame of our Washington depended upon his military achievements would the common consent of the world allow him the pre-eminence he possesses ? The victories at Trenton, Monmouth and York, brilliant as they were, exhibiting as they certainly did the highest grade of military talents, are scarcely thought of. The source of the veneration and esteem which is entertained for his character, by every description...
Page 8 - The victory of Harrison was such as would have secured to a Roman general, in the best days of the republic, the honours of a triumph. He put an end to the war in the uppermost Canada.
Page 9 - ... he will be permitted to assume the title of their benefactor ; and the station which he will hold in their regard and affections will depend, not upon the number and the splendor of his victories, but upon the results and the uses which he may make of the influence he acquires from them.
Page 11 - Your happiness and prosperity, aye, the happiness and prosperity of each one of you is more important than the gratification of any individual by elevating him to office.
Page 11 - With this in your public rulers, combined with prudence and that homely quality — strong commonsense, — you cannot be in great danger ; without it, you can never be safe.
Page 18 - to confine his service to a single term, to disclaim all right of control over the public...

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