Tokugawa Ideology: Early Constructs, 1570-1680

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Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan, 1998 - Political Science - 349 pages
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The subject of modern Japanese poetry written in support of the nation's wars, long considered a taboo in postwar literary circles, is explored here in historical and cultural context. Steve Rabson presents translations and explications of works by poets who wrote both for and against war, and provides background essential for understanding why some of Japan's most famous writers swung 180 degrees to support or oppose war at different times in their careers. Through examples from American and British poetry, Rabson also shows that this phenomenon of poets changing their views is by no means exclusive to Japan. Exposing the efforts of some Japanese writers after 1945 to conceal or revise their poetry written during World War II, the author discusses assertions by literary critics and historians that poets bear a special "war responsibility".

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About the author (1998)

Herman Ooms is Professor of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is author of "Tokugawa Ideology: Early Constructs (1570-1680)" (1985) and "Charismatic Bureaucrat: A Political Biography of Matsudaira Sadanobu (1758-1829)

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