Turkish Foreign Policy During the Second World War: An 'Active' Neutrality

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 7, 2004 - History - 252 pages
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The strategic importance of Turkey at the outset of the Second World War made it inevitable that the newly-born republic should be the target of covetous glances from every great power. This book provides the first comprehensive and systematic analysis of Turkish diplomacy during the conflict, as the Turks successively fended off pressure from both the Axis and Allied powers to enter the war. The Turkish position of 'active neutrality' was criticised both at the time and subsequently for its 'immorality', but Professor Deringil shows that Turkey's own military and political weakness made any other course of action impractical. Preservation of the nascent Turkish state had to be the guiding principle behind her foreign policy, and this was pursued with considerable tactical acumen by diplomats and strategists still, to some extent, versed in the Ottoman tradition.
  

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Contents

Acknowledgements page
1
Military inadequacy
31
The historical conditioning of a generation
58
Turkey at the outbreak of war
71
1940
92
1941
117
1942
133
1944
166
Notes
193
Bibliography
221
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Selim Deringil is Professor of History at Bo azici University in Istanbul, Turkey. He is the author of The Well-Protected Domains: Ideology and the Legitimation of Power in the Ottoman Empire, 1876 1909 (1999).

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