The History of the Works of the Learned ..., Volume 5 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. Robinson, 1739 - Bibliography
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Containing impartial accounts and accurate abstracts of the most valuable books published in Great Britain and foreign parts ...
  

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Page 340 - Praise the Lord from the earth, ye dragons and all deeps. Fire and hail, snow and vapour, stormy wind fulfilling his word.
Page 340 - Let them praise the name of the Lord: for his name alone is excellent; his glory is above the earth and heaven.
Page 341 - Go, from the creatures thy instructions take: Learn from the birds what food the thickets yield; Learn from the beasts the physic of the field; Thy arts of building from the bee receive; Learn of the mole to plough, the worm to weave; Learn of the little nautilus to sail, Spread the thin oar, and catch the driving gale.
Page 66 - Is it for thee the lark ascends and sings? Joy tunes his voice, joy elevates his wings. Is it for thee the linnet pours his throat? Loves of his own and raptures swell the note.
Page 66 - The juice nectareous, and the balmy dew; For me, the mine a thousand treasures brings ; For me, health gushes from a thousand springs ; Seas roll to waft me, suns to light me rise ; My foot-stool earth, my canopy the skies.
Page 338 - Nor think, in nature's state they blindly trod; The state of nature was the reign of God : Self-love and social at her birth began , Union the bond of all things, and of man. Pride then was not; nor Arts, that pride to aid; Man walk'd with beast , joint tenant of the shade; The same his table , and the same his bed ; No murder cloath'd him, and no murder fed.
Page 68 - Cease then, nor order imperfection name : Our proper bliss depends on what we blame. Know thy own point : This kind, this due degree Of blindness, weakness, Heaven bestows on thee.
Page 355 - The strength he gains is from th' embrace he gives. On their own axis as the planets run, Yet make at once their circle round the sun; So two consistent motions act the soul; And one regards itself, and one the whole. Thus God and nature link'd the gen'ral frame, And bade self-love and social be the same.
Page 348 - Th' enormous faith of many made for one ; That proud exception to all Nature's laws, T" invert the world, and counterwork its cause ? Force first made conquest, and that conquest law...
Page 94 - For him alone, Hope leads from goal to goal, And opens still, and opens on his soul, 'Till lengthen'd on to Faith, and unconfin'd, It pours the bliss that fills up all the mind.

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