Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality

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Cambridge University Press, 2005 - History - 451 pages
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This is a book about Kant's views on causality as understood in their proper historical context. Specifically, Eric Watkins argues that a grasp of Leibnizian and anti-Leibnizian thought in 18th century Germany helps one to see how the Critical Kant argued for causal principles that have both metaphysical and epistemological elements. On this reading Kant's model of causality does not consist of events, but rather of substances endowed with causal powers that are exercised according to their natures and circumstances.
  

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Contents

V
23
VI
24
VII
38
VIII
50
IX
73
X
81
XI
93
XII
101
XXV
237
XXVI
243
XXVII
265
XXVIII
282
XXIX
296
XXX
299
XXXI
301
XXXII
304

XIII
104
XIV
112
XV
140
XVI
160
XVII
170
XVIII
177
XIX
181
XX
185
XXI
203
XXII
217
XXIII
229
XXIV
230
XXXIII
317
XXXIV
343
XXXV
360
XXXVI
362
XXXVII
363
XXXVIII
389
XXXIX
421
XL
423
XLI
431
XLII
441
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About the author (2005)

Eric Watkins is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, San Diego.

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