River of Stars: Selected Poems of Yosano Akiko

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Shambhala, 1997 - Poetry - 134 pages
2 Reviews
Guilt mingles with relief, leaving Drizzt uniquely vulnerable to the persuasions of his newest companion--Dahlia, a darkly alluring elf and the only other member of their party to survive the cataclysm at Mount Hotenow. But traveling with Dahlia is challenging in more ways than one. As the two companions seek revenge on the one responsible for leveling Neverwinter--and nearly Luskan as well--Drizzt finds his usual moral certainty swept away by her unconventional views. Forced to see the dark deeds that the common man may be driven to by circumstance, Drizzt begins to find himself on the wrong side of the law in an effort to protect those the law has failed. Making new enemies, as his old enemies acquire deadly allies, Drizzt and Dahlia quickly find themselves embroiled in battle--a state he's coming to enjoy a little too much.

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Review: River of Stars: Selected Poems

User Review  - Yeoldefoole - Goodreads

I found my own heart unexpectedly & deeply engaged by her work! I recommend this! Read full review

Review: River of Stars: Selected Poems

User Review  - rati - Goodreads

Two poems from this collection: By a nameless stream - small and very beautiful, last night spent alone- these broad desolate fields in a harsh summer dawn My shining black hair fallen into disarray, a thousand tangles, like a thousand tangled thoughts about my .... for ... Read full review

Contents

Mountain Moving Day
105
Cold Supper
119
About the Translators and the Artist
134
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Yosano's romantic verse and concern for the welfare of the individual inspired her contemporaries and generations of later poets. While later feminist writers felt the need to abandon their traditional roles in order to write, Yosano felt that her love affair and eventual marriage with her teacher of tanka (Yosano Tekkan), her raising of 11 children, and her life as a homemaker and mother stimulated her creativity.

Sam Hamill was born in 1943 and at the age of 3, was adopted from foster care by a family from Utah. Early experiences with violence, theft, jail time, and boot camp were offset by his growing interest in poetry. He attended Los Angeles Valley College and the University of California in Santa Barbara. As a UCSB student, Hamill won a $500 award for producing the best university literary magazine in the country. With that money he left UCSB and co-founded the all-poetry Copper Canyon Press with Bill O'Daly and Tree Swenson. Hamill was editor-printer for the press from 1972 until 2004. He has written more than a dozen collections of poetry including Destination Zero: Poems 1970-1995, Gratitude, Dumb Luck, Almost Paradise: New and Selected Poems and Translations, and Measured by Stone. He also published several collections of essays and numerous translations including A Poet's Work and Crossing the Yellow River: 300 Poems from the Chinese. He has taught in prisons, in artist-in-residency programs, and has worked extensively with battered woman and children. He has won two Washington Governor's Arts Awards, the Stanley Lindberg Lifetime Achievement Award for Editing, and the Washington Poets Association Lifetime Achievement Award for poetry.

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