Dark Midnight When I Rise: The Story of the Fisk Jubilee Singers

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HarperCollins, Jul 1, 2001 - Biography & Autobiography - 512 pages
2 Reviews

Setting out initially to raise money for their university, the Fisk Jubilee Singers -- a troupe of young ex-slaves and freedmen -- ended up changing the face of American music. Despite their venues of small-town churches and train stations, and the hardships of poverty and racism, the Jubilee Singers eventually became a popular vocal group whose admirers included Ulysses S. Grant and Queen Victoria.

Recounted here for the first time is the career of the Jubilee Singers, which followed one of the most remarkable progressions in American history: from whipping post and auction block to concert hall and throne room.

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Review: Dark Midnight When I Rise: The Story of the Jubilee Singers, Who Introduced the World to the Music of Black America

User Review  - Patrick Whitman - Goodreads

Very excellent. Read full review

Review: Dark Midnight When I Rise: The Story of the Jubilee Singers, Who Introduced the World to the Music of Black America

User Review  - Cynthia Karl - Goodreads

Even though it can get a bit boggy with detail in spots, this is a book well worth reading. I was totally unfamiliar with the "Jubilee Singers" and knew little about Fisk University in Nashville ... Read full review

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About the author (2001)

Andrew Ward is the author of numerous books, most recently the award- winning "Dark Midnight When I Rise: The Story of the Jubilee Singers," He is a former contributing editor at "The Atlantic Monthly," commentator for National Public Radios "All Things Considered," columnist for "The Washington Post," and screenwriter.

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