The Big Bang: Third Edition

Front Cover
Macmillan, Dec 6, 2000 - Science - 512 pages
1 Review
Our universe was born billions of years ago in a hot, violent explosion of elementary particles and radiationæthe big bang. What do we know about this ultimate moment of creation, and how do we know it?

Drawing upon the latest theories and technology, the new edition of The Big Bang, is a sweeping, lucid account of the event that set the universe in motion. Award-winning astronomer and physicist Joseph Silk begins his story with the first microseconds of the big bang, on through the evolution of stars, galaxies, clusters of galaxies, quasars, and into the distant future of our universe. He also explores the fascinating evidence for the big bang model and recounts the history of cosmological speculation. Revised and updated, the new edition features all the most recent astronomical advances, including:

• Photos and measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope, Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE), and Infrared Space Observatory
• The latest estimates of the age of the universe
• New ideas in string and superstring theory
• Recent experiments on neutrino detection
• New theories about the presence of dark matter in galaxies
• New developments in the theory of the formation and evolution of galaxies
• The latest ideas about black holes, worm holes, quantum foam, and multiple universes

A marvelous introduction to scientific cosmology, The Big Bang takes readers on a spectacular journey spanning time and space.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
1
III
2
IV
6
V
8
VI
9
VII
10
VIII
16
IX
22
LXXVI
222
LXXVII
224
LXXVIII
226
LXXIX
228
LXXX
229
LXXXI
233
LXXXII
235
LXXXIII
239

X
24
XI
29
XII
31
XIII
38
XIV
46
XV
53
XVI
55
XVII
58
XVIII
63
XX
65
XXI
71
XXII
75
XXIII
81
XXIV
85
XXVI
88
XXVII
91
XXVIII
92
XXIX
96
XXX
100
XXXI
105
XXXII
107
XXXIII
109
XXXIV
111
XXXV
113
XXXVI
115
XXXVII
122
XXXVIII
123
XXXIX
126
XL
129
XLI
130
XLII
134
XLIII
139
XLIV
140
XLV
141
XLVI
142
XLVII
143
XLVIII
149
L
150
LI
155
LII
157
LIII
158
LIV
159
LV
161
LVI
162
LVII
163
LVIII
169
LIX
170
LX
172
LXI
176
LXII
183
LXIII
187
LXIV
189
LXV
191
LXVI
192
LXVII
194
LXVIII
202
LXX
205
LXXI
211
LXXII
213
LXXIII
215
LXXIV
216
LXXV
221
LXXXIV
240
LXXXV
245
LXXXVI
247
LXXXVII
255
LXXXVIII
256
LXXXIX
257
XC
259
XCIII
267
XCIV
276
XCV
278
XCVI
285
XCVII
288
XCVIII
296
XCIX
299
C
301
CI
309
CIII
314
CIV
317
CV
320
CVI
323
CVII
329
CVIII
330
CIX
331
CX
333
CXI
337
CXII
339
CXIII
340
CXIV
345
CXV
347
CXVI
350
CXVII
351
CXVIII
355
CXIX
359
CXX
361
CXXI
368
CXXII
369
CXXIII
370
CXXIV
372
CXXV
376
CXXVI
385
CXXVII
387
CXXVIII
388
CXXIX
389
CXXX
390
CXXXI
391
CXXXII
392
CXXXIII
393
CXXXIV
395
CXXXV
396
CXXXVI
397
CXXXVII
399
CXXXVIII
400
CXXXIX
401
CXL
402
CXLI
403
CXLII
405
CXLIII
409
CXLIV
449
CXLV
455
CXLVI
479
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

Joseph Silk is the Head of Astrophysics and Savilian Professor of Astronomy in the Department of Physics at the University of Oxford. Previously, he was a tenured professor at the University of California at Berkeley, where he researched theoretical astrophysics. He has received several awards for his contributions to astronomy, and is currently a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society, and of the Royal Society, United Kingdom. He is the author of several books, including A Short History of the Universe, Cosmic Enigmas, and The Left Hand of Creation, written with John D. Barrow. He lives in Oxford, England.

Bibliographic information