The life of Samuel Johnson. [With] The principal corrections and additions to the first edition (Google eBook)

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1807
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Page 470 - No, Sir ; there is nothing which has yet been contrived by man, by which so much happiness is produced as by a good tavern or inn.
Page 356 - The greatest part of a writer's time is spent in reading, in order to write ; a man will turn over half a library to make one book.
Page 246 - Then we upon our globe's last verge shall go, And see the ocean leaning on the sky ; From thence our rolling neighbours we shall know, And on the lunar world securely pry.
Page 228 - It having been observed that there was little hospitality in London : JOHNSON. ' Nay, sir, any man who has a name, or who has the power of pleasing, will be very generally invited in London. The man Sterne, I have been told, has had engagements for three months." GOLDSMITH. "And a very dull fellow.
Page 49 - ... supposing your arguments to be weak and inconclusive. But, Sir, that is not enough. An argument which does not convince yourself may convince the judge to whom you urge it ; and if it does convince him, why, then. Sir, you are wrong, and he is right. It is his business to judge ; and you are not to be confident in your own opinion that a cause is bad, but to say all you can for your client, and then hear the judge's opinion.
Page 74 - Talking of a London life, he said: " The happiness of London is not to be conceived but by those who have been in it. I will venture to say, there is more learning and science within the circumference of ten miles from where we now sit, than in all the rest of the kingdom.
Page 191 - I believe they might be good beings, but they were not fit to be in the University of Oxford. A cow is a very good animal in the field, but we turn her out of a garden.
Page 6 - Redress the rigours of the inclement clime ; Aid slighted truth with thy persuasive strain ; Teach erring man to spurn the rage of gain : Teach him, that states of native strength...
Page 257 - Sir, that is because at first she has full time and makes her nest deliberately. In the case you mention she is pressed to lay, and must therefore make her nest quickly, and consequently it will be slight." GOLDSMITH. " The nidification of birds is what is least known in natural history, though one of the most curious things in it.
Page 469 - The master of the house is anxious to entertain his guests ; the guests are anxious to be agreeable to him : and no man, but a very impudent dog indeed, can as freely command what is in another man's house, as if it were his own. Whereas, at a tavern, there is a general freedom from anxiety. You are sure you are welcome : and the more noise you make, the more trouble you give, the more good things you call for, the welcoroer you are.

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