The last earl of Desmond [by C.B. Gibson]. (Google eBook)

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Page 240 - ... the most High ruleth in the kingdom of men, and giveth it to whomsoever he will.
Page 69 - The mother of Sisera looked out at a window and cried through the lattice Why is his chariot so long in coming? why tarry the wheels of his chariots?
Page 192 - Surely Thou didst set them in slippery places : Thou castedst them down into destruction. How are they brought into desolation, as in a moment ! They are utterly consumed with terrors. As a dream when one awaketh ; So, 0 Lord, when Thou awakest, Thou shalt despise their image.
Page 356 - O Woman ! in our hours of ease Uncertain, coy, and hard to please, And variable as the shade By the light quivering aspen made; When pain and anguish wring the brow, A ministering angel thou!
Page 191 - I have seen the wicked in great power, and spreading himself like a green bay tree. Yet he passed away, and, lo, he was not: yea, I sought him, but he could not be found.
Page 105 - Seemed to have known a better day; The harp, his sole remaining joy, Was carried by an orphan boy. The last of all the Bards was he, Who sung of Border chivalry: For, welladay!
Page 127 - RICH and rare were the gems she wore, And a bright gold ring on her wand she bore ; But oh ! her beauty was far beyond Her sparkling gems, or snow-white wand. " Lady ! dost thou not fear to stray, " So lone and lovely through this bleak way ? " Are Erin's sons so good or so cold, " As not to be tempted by woman or gold...
Page 320 - Did alwaies sore, beating his yron wings ; And after him Owles and Night-ravens flew, The hatefull messengers of heavy things, Of death and dolor telling sad tidings, Whiles sad Celeno, sitting on a clifte, A song of bale and bitter sorrow sings, That hart of flint asonder could have rifte ; Which having ended after him she flyeth swifte. All these before the gates of Pluto lay, By whom they passing spake unto them nought ; But th' Elfin knight with wonder all the way Did feed his eyes, and fild...
Page 185 - He ceased, for both seemed highly pleased, and Death Grinned horrible a ghastly smile, to hear His famine should be filled, and blessed his maw Destined to that good hour. No less rejoiced His mother bad, and thus bespake her sire: "The key of this infernal pit, by due...
Page 165 - It is better to go to the house of mourning, than to go to the house of feasting: for that is the end of all men; and the living will lay it to his heart.

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