Proceedings of the Royal Philosophical Society of Glasgow, Volume 24 (Google eBook)

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The Society, 1893 - Science
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Page 20 - ... vast, and at a rate of progression so rapid as to constitute a new reproach and danger ; believing that not only the morality of their citizens, but their commercial prosperity is dependent upon the diminution of these evils ; seeing, also, that all that general legislation has been hitherto able to effect has been some improvement in public order, while it has been powerless to produce any perceptible decrease of intemperance, it would seem somewhat hard, when such communities are willing,...
Page 13 - The purity of motive in such circumstances can hardly be impugned, and therefore it is all the more interesting to note that the system has spread in Norway as rapidly as in Sweden. In practically every town in Norway with a licensing authority 51 in all a society has been formed to monopolise the licenses. In the first thirteen years after the system was introduced into Bergen, in Norway, the net profit amounted to 79,000, or an average of 6,000 per annum, being over 2s. 8d. per head...
Page 18 - At the conclusion of these 10 years it was evident that, on the whole, the cause of public order and morality had not prospered in Gothenburg, and many people were ready to pronounce the new system a failure. In the year 1876, however, a change set in, and the last...
Page 20 - It is improbable that in the first instance many buroughs would avail themselves of these powers. As in Sweden, the results of the experiment by one community would be prudently awaited by others. It might fall to Birmingham alone to furnish the experience which would determine other towns to adopt or reject so novel and vast an undertaking. If it succeeds, great public good will have been done; if it fails, the loss will affect only the community which has committed itself to the experiment. " The...
Page 128 - That every child who is deaf should have full opportunity of being educated on the Pure Oral System. In all schools which receive Government grants, whether conducted on the oral, sign and manual, or combined system, all children should be, for the first year at least, instructed on the oral system, and after the first year they should be taught to speak and lip-read on the pure oral system, unless they are physically or mentally disqualified...
Page 40 - ... barometer, but we must remember that the only winds which can bring rain to Zimbabwe, at least in winter, are the South-easterly winds, and these, like all winds blowing towards the Equator, increase the atmospheric pressure. Zimbabwe is situated on the edge of a plateau about 3,400 feet above sea-level. The country breaks down gradually towards the south and east, and more rapidly towards the west ; while towards the north it rises gently until, after about 100 miles, it attains an altitude...
Page 18 - Two years ago a report upon the working of the system in Sweden was specially drawn up for our Foreign Office. This report states : ' There can be little doubt that the influence of the new system must have been beneficial from the very commencement...
Page 148 - ... Gesellschaft (19 Jahrgang). The Glasgow star places were at once looked on with confidence by the numerous observers of comets and minor planets. One point connected with the Catalogue deserves special mention, viz. that, although the observations from which it is derived extend over a space of twenty-one years, the work appeared within two years of the close of the series. This promptitude excites the greater admiration when we learn that, exclusive of Prof. Grant's personal share in the work,...
Page 3 - Lenz, in 1834, summed up the matter by saying that in all cases of electromagnetic induction the induced currents have such a direction that their reaction tends to stop the motion which produces them.
Page 143 - Throughout the book no one can fail to be struck with the rare skill, integrity, and discernment the author has displayed in tracing the successive stages of progress ; or with the scrupulous care he has taken to assign to each of the great men whom he reviews their proper share in the common labour. Nowhere is this more conspicuous than in the discussion relative to the discovery of the planet Neptune. By a simple narration of facts he has placed the history...

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