A Pluralistic Universe: Hibbert Lectures to Manchester College on the Present Situation in Philosophy (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1909 - Philosophy, Modern - 404 pages
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Page 151 - for objections to his conclusions into factors of their support. The vaster orders of mind go with the vaster orders of body. The entire earth on which we live must have, according to Fechner, its own collective consciousness. So must each sun, moon, and planet ; so must the whole solar
Page 113 - We long for the absolute only in so far as in us the absolute also longs, and seeks through our very temporal striving, the peace that is nowhere in time, but only, and yet absolutely, in eternity. Were there no longing in time there would be no peace in eternity. . . . God [i. e. the absolute]
Page 151 - to Fechner, its own collective consciousness. So must each sun, moon, and planet ; so must the whole solar systernhave its own wider consciousness, in which the consciousness of our earth plays one part. So has the entire starry system as such its consciousness ; and if that starry system be not the
Page 114 - who here in me aims at what I now temporally miss, not only possesses in the eternal world the goal after which I strive, but comes to possess it even through and because of my sorrow. Through this my tribulation the absolute triumph then is won. ... In the absolute I am fulfilled. Yet my very fulfilment
Page 351 - in a way which it feels is not its way and which it cannot repeat as its own. . . . For to be satisfied, my intellect must understand, and it cannot understand by taking a congeries in the lump' (p. 570). So Mr. Bradley, in the sole interests of
Page 391 - is action, this is effectuation in the only shape in which, by a pure experience-philosophy, the whereabouts of it anywhere can be discussed. Here is creation in its first intention, here is causality at work. 1 To treat this offhand as the bare illusory
Page 245 - the causes that govern its direction. Instead of being interpreters of reality, concepts negate the inwardness of reality altogether. They make the whole notion of a causal influence between finite things incomprehensible. No real activities and indeed no real connexions of any kind can obtain if we follow the conceptual logic;
Page 392 - I owe all my doctrines on this subject to Renouvier; and Renouvier, as I understand him, is (or at any rate then was) an out and out phenomenist, a denier of 'forces' in the most strenuous sense. Single clauses in my writing, or sentences read out of their connexion, may possibly have been compatible with a
Page 392 - Single clauses in my writing, or sentences read out of their connexion, may possibly have been compatible with a transphenomenal principle of energy; but I defy any one to show a single sentence which, taken with its context, should be naturally held to advocate that view. The misinterpretation probably arose at first from my having defended (after Renouvier) the

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