Gigi and The Cat

Front Cover
Random House, Apr 30, 2011 - Fiction - 160 pages
24 Reviews

GIGI TRANSLATED BY ROGER SENHOUSE, THE CAT TRANSLATED BY ANTONIA WHITE

Gigi's days are filled with cigars, lobster, lace and superstitions: the education of a future courtesan. Bored and unconvinced by what she's taught, Gigi surprises all with her approach to love. In this classic turn-of-the-century novella, Colette unveils Gigi's journey into womanhood in rich and supple prose.

This edition includes The Cat translated by Antonia White.

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Review: Gigi & The Cat

User Review  - Phoebe Lynn - Goodreads

I love Colette, especially her characters - it is interesting to see how they come alive, to understand their view of the world, and to see some of their quirks in my own personality! Read full review

Review: Gigi & The Cat

User Review  - Hannah L. - Goodreads

4 stars for "Gigi," maybe 3 for "The Cat" (but I have a feeling it would have been higher if I'd read a better translation). Read full review

About the author (2011)

'Me a feminist?' She scoffed in 1910. 'I'll tell you what the suffragettes deserve: the whip and the harem'. Colette was an intriguing and flamboyant figure. Born Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette in Burgundy in 1873 she moved to Paris at the age of 20 with her husband, the writer and critic, Henry Gauthiers-Viller (Willy). Forcing Colette to write, Willy published her novels in his name and the Claudine series became an instant success. She escaped her exploitative first husband to live by her pen and work in music-halls as a dancer. Colette had a lesbian love affair with Napoleon's niece, she married three times, had a baby at 40 and at 47, preferring 'passion to goodness', she seduced her teenage stepson. In the meantime she wrote stunning novels that were admired by Proust and Gide - Gigi, Sido, Cheri, and Break of Day. Colette lived to be over 80. She was the first woman President of the Academie Goncourt and was the first woman in France to be accorded a state funeral.

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