A Dividend to Labor: A Study of Employers' Welfare Institutions (Google eBook)

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Houghton, Miffin, 1899 - Profit-sharing - 400 pages
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Page 353 - Between the workman and the master there are frequent relations, but no real association. I am of opinion, upon the whole, that the manufacturing/ aristocracy which is growing up under our eyes is one of ( the harshest which ever existed in the world ; but, at the t same time, it is one' of the most confined and least dangerous.
Page 352 - The manufacturer asks nothing of the workman but his labor ; the workman expects nothing from him but his wages. The one contracts no obligation to protect, nor the other to defend ; and they are not permanently connected either by habit or by duty. The aristocracy created by business rarely settles in the midst of the manufacturing population which it directs ; the object is not to govern that population, but to use it.
Page 39 - Drinkwater did not come with me to introduce me to any of the people, and thus, uninstructed, I had to take the management of the concern. I had to purchase the raw material, to make the machines, for the mill was not nearly filled with machinery, to manufacture the cotton into yarn, to sell it, and to keep the accounts, pay the wages, and, in fact, to take the whole responsibility of the first fine cotton spinning establishment by machinery that had ever been erected...
Page 39 - I looked grave, inspected everything very minutely, examined the drawings and calculations of the machinery, as left by Mr. Lee, and these were of great use to me. I was with the first in the morning, and I locked up the premises at night, taking the keys with me. I continued this silent inspection and superintendence day by day for six weeks, saying merely yes or no to the questions of what was to be done or otherwise, and during that period I did not give one direct order about anything.
Page 352 - The territorial aristocracy of former ages was either bound by law, or thought itself bound by usage, to come to the relief of its serving-men, and to succor their distresses. But the manufacturing aristocracy of our age first impoverishes and debases the men who serve it, and then abandons them to be supported by the charity of the public.
Page 353 - I am of opinion, upon the whole, that the manufacturing , aristocracy which is growing up under our eyes is one of the harshest which ever existed in the world ; but, at the .' same time, it is one of the most confined and least dangerous. Nevertheless, the friends of democracy should keep their eyes anxiously fixed in this direction ; for if ever a permanent inequality of conditions and aristocracy again penetrate into the world, it may be predicted that this is the gate by which they will enter.
Page 49 - This consisted of a four-sided piece of wood, about two inches long and one broad, each side coloured one side black, another blue, the third yellow, and the fourth white, tapered at the top, and finished with wire eyes, to hang upon a hook with either side to the front.
Page 40 - I continued this sileut inspection and superintendence day by day for six weeks, saying merely ' yes ' or ' no ' to the questions of what was to be done or otherwise, and during that period I did not give one direct order about anything.
Page 376 - I have tried the plan for seventeen years, and have found it to answer much beyond my hopes ; inasmuch as it completely identifies the workmen with the success of the farm, besides giving me full liberty to travel on the Continent for a year at a time ; and on my return, I have always found that the farm had prospered more than when I was present.
Page 31 - The population nourished on this aliment, is crowded into one dense mass, in cottages, separated by narrow, unpaved, and almost pestilential streets, in an atmosphere loaded with smoke and the exhalations of a large manufacturing city.

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