A brief account of the life, writings, and inventions of Sir Samuel Morland: master of mechanics to Charles the Second... (Google eBook)

Front Cover
E. Johnson; London, Whittaker & co., 1838 - Computers - 31 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - Kalender, which instructed him all by feeling ; and other pretty and useful inventions of mills, pumps, &c. and the pump he had erected that serves water to his garden, and to passengers, with an inscription, and brings from a filthy part of the Thames neere it a most perfect and pure water.
Page 14 - A description of the Tuba-stentorophonica, an instrument of excellent use, as well by sea as by land." In this rare tract, consisting of eight leaves, he gives an account of the various experiments that he made before his instrument attained a certain degree of perfection. The first trumpet that he constructed, although...
Page 35 - If water can be obtained at an elevation, pipes with plugs or fire-cocks on them, are preferable to any other mode at present in use. The size of the pipes will depend on the distance and elevation of the head, and also on the size of the buildings to be protected. It may be assumed as a general rule, that the intensity of a fire depends, in a great measure, on the cubic contents of the buildings ; distinction being made as to the nature and contents of such buildings.
Page 36 - ... will, if perfectly tight, draw from. a much greater depth than 14 feet (2 feet being allowed for the height of the engine), still a very trifling leakage will render it useless for the time, at such a depth. The worst mode of supplying engines with water, is by covered sunk tanks; they are generally too small, and unless very numerous, confine the engines to one or two particular spots, obliging the firemen to increase the length of the hose, which materially diminishes the effect of the fire...
Page 16 - Water being converted into vapour by the force of fire, these vapours shortly require a larger space (about 2000 times) than the water before occupied, and rather than be constantly confined would split a cannon. But being duly regulated according to the rules of statics, and by science reduced to measure, weight, and balance...
Page 15 - Hydrostatics; or, instructions concerning water-works," and contains an account of his various methods of raising water, besides tables of square and cube roots: from the close of Joseph Morland's preface, it appears that many of his father's works were still left unpublished. There is also a treatise by Sir Samuel, in the Harleian collection of manuscripts, which is entitled...
Page 36 - ... consumption, as it is likely that the steam engines would be at work before that quantity was exhausted. This is what may be supposed to be required, in case of serious fires in dock-yards, in large stacks of warehouses, or in large manufactories. Where water can be had at nearly the level of the premises, such as from rivers, canals, &c., if it is not thought prudent to erect elevated tanks, the water may be conducted under the surface by large cast-iron pipes, with openings at such distances...
Page 39 - ... one about 1 inch above the plug-box. These and other experiments, prove the necessity of placing the plugs on the mains, and not on the service pipes, where there are mains in the street. The different modes of obtaining water from the mains or pipes are shown in the accompanying drawings.
Page 10 - ... and useful inventions of mills, pumps, &c., and the pump he had erected, that serves water to his garden, and to passengers, with an inscription, and brings from a filthy part of the Thames near it, a most perfect and pure water. He had newly buried <£200 worth of music-books, being, as he said, love songs and vanity. He plays himself psalms and religious hymns on the Theorbo.
Page 38 - Battersea by 4250 yards of iron pipes of 20 inches diameter, 1000 yards of 15 inches diameter, 1400 yards of 9 inches diameter. The weather was nearly the same, but the place of experiment was more protected from the wind, than in Union Street. 1st. With one standcock open, a jet 60 feet in height was produced, and 107 gallons per minute were delivered. 2nd. The second standcock was then opened, and the difference in the first jet was barely perceptible. 3rd. Other two standcocks being opened, the...

Bibliographic information