Becoming a Man: Half a Life Story

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Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1992 - Social Science - 278 pages
23 Reviews
A child of the 1950s from a small New England town, "perfect Paul" earns straight A's and shines in social and literary pursuits, all the while keeping a secret -- from himself and the rest of the world. Struggling to be, or at least to imitate, a straight man, through Ivy League halls of privilege and bohemian travels abroad, loveless intimacy and unrequited passion, Paul Monette was haunted, and finally saved, by a dream of "the thing I'd never even seen: two men in love and laughing." Searingly honest, witty, and humane, Becoming a Man is the definitive coming-out story in the classic coming-of-age genre.

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Review: Becoming a Man: Half a Life Story

User Review  - Dakoda Smith - Goodreads

I'm supposed to love this book. I read everything in this genre. I rate all of it five stars. I even feel guilty right now for telling you not to read this, when maybe you're supposed to. I've had two ... Read full review

Review: Becoming a Man: Half a Life Story

User Review  - Crochet Buddies - Goodreads

I have somewhat mixed feelings about this book. Not being gay myself, I have limited ability to empathize, but his prolonged pain, being in the closet, especially since all along people fairly close ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
32
Section 3
61
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (1992)

Paul Monette was born on October 16, 1945 in Lawrence, Mass., and has published numerous poetry collections, novels, novelizations, memoirs, and nonfiction works. A distinguished author of both poetry and prose, Monette's writings often explored issues relating to homosexuality and AIDS. After receiving critical acclaim in 1975 for a poetry collection The Carpenter at the Asylum, he veered away from his mainstay theme and produced an unlikely pair of books that demonstrated his poet's way with words. The books were No Witnesses, a collection of poems featuring imaginary adventures of famous figures, written in 1981, and The Long Shot, a mystery in which an avid shopper and a forger team to solve a murder. However, his following mystery, Lightfall, written in 1982, was not well-received by the critics. Monette next wrote Becoming a Man: Half a Life Story, which won the National Book Award for nonfiction in 1992. His last work, Last Watch of the Night: Essays Too Personal and Otherwise, was a collection of 10 moving and uncompromising essays dealing with topics such as his beloved dog Puck and the 1993 Gay and Lesbian March on Washington, D.C. Paul Monette died as a result of complications from AIDS on February 18, 1995.

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