Norfolk Archaeology: Or, Miscellaneous Tracts Relating to the County of Norfolk (Google eBook)

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Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society, 1872 - Norfolk (England)
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Page 336 - The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power, And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave, Await alike the inevitable hour: The paths of glory lead but to the grave.
Page 320 - October in the tenth year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland King Defender of the Faith etc, and in the year of our Lord God One thousand seven hundred and twenty three.
Page 340 - Formerly, when deeds were more concise than at present, it was usual to write both parts on the same piece of parchment, with some word or letters of the alphabet written between them ; through which the parchment was cut, either in a straight or indented line, in such a manner as to leave half the word on one part and half on the other.
Page 293 - Ancient demesne consists of those lands or manors, which, though now perhaps granted out to private subjects, were actually in the hands of the crown in the time of Edward the Confessor, or William the Conqueror; and so appear to have been by the great survey in the exchequer called domesday-book.
Page 311 - Gentry of the County of Norfolk and of the County and City of Norwich do cordially rejoyce with many others of these Counties, and of the Nation, for your...
Page 329 - France, in despite of their power he drove the people before him like sheep, destroying towns, castles, and cities in such a manner and number that long after, in memory of this act, the sharp points and gable ends of overthrown houses and minsters were called Knollcs
Page 123 - At the north end of the high altar there was a very fine lettem of hrass, where they sung the Epistle and Gospel, with a great Pelican on the height of it, finely gilt, billing the blood out of her breast to feed her young ones...
Page 72 - ... taken down, there doth yet remain altars, standing in divers other churches ; by occasion whereof much variance and contention ariseth amongst sundry of our subjects, which, if good foresight were not had, might perhaps engender great hurt and inconvenience.
Page 312 - Nation's present Grievances and Distractions ; Do humbly conceive, That the chief Expedient, will be, the Recalling of those Members that were secluded in 1648, and sate before the Force put upon the Parliament (We of this County of Norfolk being by such Seclusion deprived of any person to represent us in Parliament) and also by filling up the vacant places thereof ; And all to be admitted without any Oath or Engagement, previous to their Entrance ; Which being done, We shall be ready to acquiesce...
Page 361 - Of such articles as may be denominated implements, the must frequent one is somewhat in the form of an adze. The greater part of these were broken ; but a few perfect specimens have been found. The cutting-edge is not equally bevelled on each side as in an axe, but flat on one side and more or less convex on the other, thus having the shape best adapted for the purpose to which an adze is applied. These tools may have been intended to quarry the chalk on the spot, and may also have been used aa hoes...

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