Tait's Edinburgh magazine (Google eBook)

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Page 508 - ... godliness hath promise of the life that now is," as well as of that which is to come.
Page 163 - But this was all. ^The clods of earth, which we so constantly belabored and turned over and over, were never etherealized into thought. (Our thoughts, on the contrary, were fast becoming cloddish. Our labor symbolized nothing, and left us mentally sluggish in the dusk of the evening. Intellectual activity is incompatible with any large amount of bodily exercise...
Page 453 - He who ascends to mountain-tops shall find The loftiest peaks most wrapt in clouds and snow ; He who surpasses or subdues mankind Must look down on the hate of those below. Though high above the sun of glory glow, And far beneath the earth and ocean spread, Round him are icy rocks, and loudly blow . Contending tempests on his naked head, And thus reward the toils which to those summits led.
Page 102 - Wherefore, that here we may briefly end, of Law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God ; her voice, the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage : the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power; both angels and men, and creatures of what condition soever, though each in different sort and manner, yet all with uniform consent, admiring her as the mother of their peace and joy.
Page 457 - As for me, I am no more yours, nor you mine. Death hath cut us asunder, and God hath divided me from the world, and you from me.
Page 51 - I did not comprehend it until, creeping with awe to the verge, I peered down into a large rent which had been made from bank to bank of the broad Zambesi, and saw that a stream of a thousand yards broad leaped down a hundred feet, and then became suddenly compressed into a space of fifteen or twenty yards.
Page 456 - I must leave him to himself, to answer it to the king and state, he shut himself into his cabin, and shot himself with a pocket pistol, which broke one of his ribs ; and finding that he had not prevailed, he thrust a long knife under his short ribs up to the handle, and died. Thus much I have written to Mr. Secretary, to whose letters I refer you ; but because I think my friends will rather hearken after you than any other to know the truth, I did after the sealing break open the...
Page 337 - Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me ; for I am meek and lowly of heart, and ye shall find rest unto your souls.
Page 163 - Our labor symbolized nothing, and left us mentally sluggish in the dusk of the evening. Intellectual activity is incompatible with any large amount of bodily exercise. The yeoman and the scholar the yeoman and the man of finest moral culture, though not the man of sturdiest sense and integrity are two distinct individuals, and can never be melted or welded into one substance.
Page 458 - Give me my scallop-shell of quiet, My staff of faith to walk upon. My scrip of joy, immortal diet, My bottle of salvation, My gown of glory, hope's true gage; And thus I'll take my pilgrimage. Blood must be my body's balmer; No other balm will there be given; Whilst my soul, like quiet palmer, Travelleth towards the land of heaven; Over the silver mountains, Where spring the nectar fountains: There will I kiss The bowl of bliss; And drink mine everlasting fill Upon every milken hill.

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