A Short History of the English People (Google eBook)

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Harper & Brothers, 1884 - Great Britain - 823 pages
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Probably the biggest contributor to the standard popular knowledge of English history in its day. Read full review

Contents

Wllfrith of York his life 64 liam the Third of England his rule 6607
66
Lindlsfarne futhbcrt becomes
68
England in the Ninth Century
76
Montcalm General 724 T25 William the First 116 see also his Repeal agitation 799
86
ENGLAND UNDER FOREIGN KINGS 10131804
93
Normandy and the Normans 9121066
100
Joan of Arc career of 283293 don 604 against France 706
109
Montfort Simon dc his relations his expectations from the Em gland
110
Saouktebei l Dr 691 his flight and death 641 against the Normans
111
Poor see Statutes Peasantry
115
Waoj poem of as an authority
117
Portreeve his position in time
121
Vn England and Anjou 8701154
126
VniHenry the Second 11541189
131
The Fall of the Angevins 11891204
139
LLJohn 12041215
147
Llewelyn of Wales his alliance with
166
The Friars
171
CHAPTER IV
183
Llewelyn apJorwertb his strug
187
The English Parliament 12831295
190
The Conquest of Scotland 12901305
201
Wallace William his career 211
211
IVThe English Town
213
CHAPTER V
235
Lollordry revival of and its sup
240
H The Good Parliament 13601377
247
Wilkins Dr 696 597 England 661 effect on his work of Tjlcrs
255
IVThe Peasant Revolt 13771381
259
CHAPTER VI
285
n The Wars of the Roses 14501471
294
Sackville his Gorbeduc 428 Shakspere highest type of Eliza Somerset Duke of iu Henry
296
in The New Monarchy 14711509
301
iVThe New Learning 15091520
315
Louis Philippe
331
Salisbury Countess of her death him 729 Roult Marshal 7857S6 791
341
IThe Protestants 15401553
355
Oxford University of its early his Patriots the oppose Wnlpole 264 tee also Lougland
363
The Martyrs 15531558
367
Martyr Peter burning of
374
in Elizabeth 15581560
376
rVEngland and Mary Stuart 15601572
387
ICTIOH TAOX V The England of Elizabeth
396
The Armada 15721588
408
St Bartholomew Massacre of
414
The Long Parliament 16401644
521
The Civil War July 1642August 1646
533
The Army and the Parliament 16461649
544
The Commonwealth 16491653
555
The Fall of Puritanism 16531660
564
CHAPTER IX
586
Stewart Dngald his estimate
594
The Restoration 16601667
602
More Sir Thomas his allusion to his resignation 748 Charles the Second
603
Reformation its eject in separa
607
The American Colonies in 1640 495
608
Charles the Second 16671673
613
Stillingfleet his schemes of Prot
619
Danby 16731678
624
Johnson Samuel a friend of gland nation at William of Oranges
630
Shaftesbury 16791682
633
Repyngdon his sermons 257
637
The Second Stuart Tyranny 16821088
641
William of Orange
651
The Grand Alliance 16891694
662
Marlborough 16981712
676
Masbam Mrs
691
Walpole 17121742
692
Sarsfleld General in Ireland 670 his ministry 751 SouthSaxons nee Saxons South
699
CHAPTER X
706
H The Independence of America 17611785 pk VTJlQ
725
Massachusetts attacks on the lib
740
The Second Pitt 17831789
748
Oxford Earl of Henry the Sev subsequent struggles of after Pitt William the younger his first
750
Joseph the Second of Austria mo Latimer Hugh studies at Padna his treachery to William
754
Paris University of its Importance Peucriche Richard a teacher In failure of his bill for Parliament
757
Jutes their position in England Imprisoned and deposed 361 StatesGeneral
760
Paris Treaty of 745 of feeling toward Cromwell In his opposition to Burke 763705
763
The War with France 17931815
768
Test Act see Statutes
770
Parker the Roman Catholic presi Ferren Alice her influence at with the peerage 77C
773
Parliaments rise of 191194197 260
779
Saxons East and West their colo 248 its treatment by Bonaparte
784
Massena Marshal
786
Keubi execution of 122 Land his intolerance 465 Leyton Commissioner of Monas
793
Epilogue 18151873
796
England in the Nineteenth Century 803
802
Massey made Dean of Christ
817
May his account of the atrocities
825
Rump the Commonwealth
826

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Page 585 - ... whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit ; or a terrace for a wandering and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect ; or a tower of state for a proud mind to raise itself upon; or a fort or commanding ground for strife and contention; or a shop for profit or sale; and not a rich storehouse for the glory of the Creator and the relief of man's estate.
Page 423 - O, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost thence my nature is subdued To what it works in, like the dyer's hand.
Page 557 - I have sought the Lord night and day, that He would rather slay me than put me upon the doing of this work.
Page 334 - ... had I but served God as diligently as I have served the king, he would not have given me over in my gray hairs.
Page 502 - I must tell you, there are two kings and two kingdoms in Scotland. There is King James, the head of the commonwealth, and there is Christ Jesus the King, and his kingdom the Kirk, whose subject King James the Sixth is, and of whose kingdom he is not a king, nor a lord, nor a head, but a member.
Page 575 - Memory and her syren daughters ; but by devout prayer to that Eternal Spirit, who can enrich with all utterance and knowledge, and sends out his seraphim with the hallowed fire of his altar to touch and purify the lips of whom he pleases...
Page 582 - For my name and memory, I leave it to men's charitable speeches, and to foreign nations, and to the next age.
Page 423 - I am as sorry as if the original fault had been my fault, because myself have seen his demeanour no less civil than he excellent in the quality he professes: besides, divers of worship have reported his uprightness of dealing which argues his honesty, and his facetious grace in writing, that approves his art.
Page 529 - I came into the House one morning, well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled ; for it was a plain cloth suit which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor ; his linen was plain, and not very clean, and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar ; his hat was without a hatband ; his stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side ; his countenance swollen and reddish ; his...
Page 452 - Yet be it less or more, or soon or slow, It shall be still in strictest measure even To that same lot, however mean or high, Toward which Time leads me, and the will of Heaven ; All is, if I have grace to use it so, As ever in my great Task-Master's eye.

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