Parley's Common School History of the World: A Pictorial History of the World, Ancient and Modern, for the Use of Schools (Google eBook)

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E.H. Butler & Company, 1870 - World history - 360 pages
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Contents

Cyrus conquers Babylon His death
23
Reign of Cambyses
24
About Darius Expedition of Xerxes into Greece
26
Affairs of Persia till the Saracen Conquest
28
XII Modern History of Persia
29
CHAPTER t CLXV Causes which led to the Revolution 304
30
About the Hebrews or Jews Origin of the Hebrews The Removal of Jacob and his Children to Egypt
32
The Bondage in Esypt Flight of the Hebrews and Destruction ol Pharaoh and his Host
34
About the Wanderings of the Israelites in the Wilderness
37
Overthrow of the Midianites Samson Judge of Israel
38
Samsons Exploits and Death
39
Beginning of the Reign of Saul
42
Combat of David and Goliath
43
The Reign of David Wisdom of Solomon
45
The Building of the Temple Visit of the Queen of Sheba
47
The Decline of the Jewish Nation
49
The Hebrew Prophets
50
Crucifixion of the Saviour Destruction of Jerusalem
53
Early History of China
55
Anecdotes of the Chinese Emperors
57
Cities of China Manners of the Chinese
60
Origin of the Arabs Rise of Mohammed
61
Sequel of the History of the Saracens
64
About Syria Phoenicia and Asia Minor
65
About Asia Minor or Natolia
67
A Brief View of Several Nations
69
Review of the History of Asia
71
Chronology of Asia
74
AFRICA v
76
About the Geography of Africa The Inhabitants
77
Early Sovereigns of Egypt L
78
Egyptian Architecture and Sculpture
82
The Ptolemies and Queen Cleopatra
84
Sequel of the Egyptian History
86
Sketches of Ethiopian History
88
Origin of the Barbary States and their Piracies on the Christians
89
Curious Facts and Fables about Africa
91
History of the SlaveTrade
92
Chronology of Africa
93
CHAPTER pack XLVI Introductory Remarks on its Geography and other Matters
95
About Greece Where it is situated Appearance of the Country Climate
98
Extent of Greece First Settlement of the Country
101
The Grecian Lawgivers
102
War with Persia
104
Affairs of Athens
105
Beginning of the Thcban War
107
Sequel of the Theban War
108
Grecian Religion or Mythology
109
The Grecian Philosophers
111
Ttie Grecian Philosophers continued
113
Something more about the Greek Philosophers The Greek Poets
115
LVI1I About the Mode of Life among the Ancient Greeks
117
L1X Philip of Maccdon conquers Greece
119
Conquests of Alexander the Great
121
Sequel of Alexanders Career
123
Greece Invaded by the Gauls
124
LX1II End of Grecian Independence
126
LX1V Modern History of Greece
127
About Italy as it now is
128
Founding of Rome by Romulus Its early State
132
Battle of the Horatii and Curiatii
134
From the Reign of Ancus Martins till the Expulsion of the Kings
136
The Story of Coriolanus
137
Rome Invaded by the Gauls The first Punic War
139
Second and third Punic Wars
141
Scipios Triumph
143
LXXUI Syllaand Marius
144
LXX1V Cneius Pompcy and Julius Ctesar
146
Caesar usurps the Supremo Power
147
Assassination of Julius Crcsar
148
Consequences of Caesars Death
150
About the great Power and Extent of the Roman Empiru in the Time of Augustus
151
The Means by which Rome acquired its Power
154
Rome under the Emperors
156
Fall of the Western Empire of the Romans
157
Progress of the Decline of Rome
159
LXXXHI Manners and Customs of the Ancient Romans
161
LXXX1V About Religion Deities Temples Marriages
162
About Funeral Rites and Ceremonies
164
LXXXVl Roman Farms Mode of Plowing Farmhouses Grain Cat tle Superstitions of the Farmers Gardens Vines
166
XXXV1I Country Houses Description of PI in ya Villa Aqueducts
168
XXXV11I Military Affairs of the Romans Division of the Army The
170
About Naval Affairs The War Galley Commerce Shows of Wild Beasts Exhibitions of Gladiators
172
Sports Chariot Racing The Circus Carriages Private En tertainments Supper Rooms Convivial Parties Luxuries
174
About Theaters Clocks and Watches The Fine Arts Books and Writing Costume Conclusion
176
A short Story about Portugal
192
Description of France Its Climate Cities Manufactures Man ners and Customs of the People
193
About the Gauls and olhcr Tribes of Barbarians IIow the South ern Parts of Europe were first settled and bow the Northern Parts were settled afterwar...
195
CHI Story of the Barbarians continued m
197
The Gauls Origin of the modern French Nation Little King Pepin
198
About Clovis and Little King Pepin 800
201
About the Crusades or Holy Wars
202
About the Feudal System 201 202
204
About Chivalry or KnightErrantry 7
207
More about Chivalry Vii Vi
209
King Philip and Pope Boniface Wars of the French and English 21
211
CX1I The Reign of several French Kings
213
The Reigns of Louis the Grand and his Successor
214
The French Revolution CXV The Rise of Napoleon Bonaparte Jjj
215
The Fall of Bonaparte
219
CXV1I Recent Affairs of France
221
About Germany
222
About the ancient Tribes of Germany Charlemagne c
223
Affairs of Switzerland
225
Sequel of German History 225
227
About Austria Hungary
229
About Hungary Bohemia tno tyroi otc CXXIV About Prussia
232
History of Prussia
233
Description of Russia
235
Description of Russia continued
236
CXXVI1I The Reign of Peter the Great
237
The Successors of Peter the Great
239
About Sweden
241
Charles the Twelfth and his Successors
243
CXXXII1 Brief Notice of several Kingdoms and States
247
CXXxTv Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
248
About London and other Cities of England Wales Scotland and Ire land
249
Origin of the British Nation The Druids
252
Saxon and Danish Kings of England
254
CXXX1X English Wars and Rebellions
257
The Lancastrian Kings of England
259
Wars of the Roses
261
CXLI1 Reigns of the Tudor Princes
262
The Reign of Elizabeth
264
CXL1V Accession of the House of Stuart
265
Wars of the King and Parliament
267
The Protectorate and the Restoration
268
CXLVI1 The Revolution of 1688 and other matters
270
The Hanoverian Kings of Great Britain 1
271
The Story of Wales jJ CL The History of Scotland Ji
275
About Ireland
277
CL1I Various Matters and Things i
278
Review The Dark Ages Important Inventions fcc an CLIV Chronology of Europe
283
AMERICA
285
About America
287
The first Inhabitants of America
289
Discovery of America by Columbus
290
A few words about Iceland and Greenland Settlements of the French in America
292
The French Colonies Conquered by English
294
Description of the United States
296
Settlement and Colonial History of New England
298
CLX1I Affairs of New Enaland continued
300
Early History of Virginia
301
Braddocks Defeat and other Matters
303
Account of the lSuttlo of Lexington
305
The Battle of Bunker Hill
307
Progress of the W ar Capture of Burgoyne
308
CLX1X The Story of Benedict Arnold and Major Andre
309
War in the South Surrender of Cornwallis
311
Affairs of the United States since the Revolution
312
The Great Rebellion
315
The Great Rebellion continued
316
The Great Rebellion continued
319
The Great Rebellion concluded
322
General Remarks on the History of the United States
323
About South America El Dorado and the Fountain of Youth
325
History of the Mexican Territories Texas Guatiinala
327
Spanish Peruvian Territories
329
Account of Brazil
330
The West Indies
331
West Indies continued
334
West Indies continued
335
Chronology of America 837
337
About Oceania Tho Malaysian Islands
338
The Australasian Division of Oceania
339
Polynesia The Sandwich Islands
341
Polynesia continued The Society Islands
343
Story of the Bounty concluded
344
Chronology of Oceania
346

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 245 - The people have a great many reindeer, whose flesh supplies food, and whose skins furnish clothing. They also take the place of horses, and drag the people over the snow in sledges, at a rapid rateThese people have no history that is worthy of being related here.
Page 12 - And all flesh died that moved upon the earth, both of fowl, and of cattle, and of beast, and of every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth, and every man : All in whose nostrils was the breath of life, of all that was in the dry land, died.
Page 161 - The other officers of the state were numerous, and invested with very different degrees of power. 4. The ministers of religion among the Romans did not form a distinct order of citizens, but were chosen from the most virtuous and honorable men of the state.
Page 111 - ... war, and Mercury the god of thieves, and Bacchus the god of drunkards, and Vulcan the god of blacksmiths. Vulcan seems to have been one of the best and most useful of the heathen deities, for he was an excellent blacksmith and worked hard at his anvil. 8. Venus was the goddess of beauty. Her statues were made in the form of a beautiful woman. She had a son named Cupid, who was a mischievous little deity, and used to shoot at people with a bow and arrow. 9. Neptune was the chief of the marine...
Page 31 - Teheran, but he has a beautiful palace at Ispahan, called the Palace of Forty Pillars. Each of the forty pillars is supported by four lions of white marble. The whole edifice looks as if it were built of pearl, and silver, and gold, and precious stones. 9. I have now done with the story of Persia. Like that of most other eastern countries, it abounds in tales of cruelty, battle, and bloodshed. In ancient times, the peopie worshipped the sun, and bowed down to idols.
Page 175 - The supper rooms of some of the emperors were hung with cloths of gold and silver, enriched with jewels. Tables were made for them of fine gold, and couches with frames of massive silver. The Romans always reclined on couches to take their meals. 11. At great entertainments the supper room was hung with flowers, and the guests were crowned with garlands. The floor was generally bare, though richly ornamented, and the ceiling was inlaid with a fretwork of gold and ivory. Scented oil was used for lighting...
Page 27 - ... and Xerxes commanded the sea to be whipped for its disrespectful conduct. 8. The greater part of the cities of Greece submitted to Xerxes ; but Sparta and Athens made a stubborn resistance. Though they could muster but few soldiers, these were far more valiant than the Persians. 9. At Thermopylae Xerxes wished to lead his army through a narrow passage between a mountain and the sea.
Page 72 - God in sincerity and truth. Jesus Christ is hardly known among the four hundred millions of people in Asia ; and though some of the rich men, kings, and princes, live in gorgeous palaces and are decked with gold and jewels, yet the mass of people live as they have done for ages, ignorant, poor, and degraded.
Page 267 - England should be rent asunder in the struggle. 5. The civil war between the cavaliers and roundheads began in 1642. Many battles were fought, and rivers of English blood were shed on both sides. 6. It was not long before Oliver Cromwell began to be a famous leader on the side of the parliament. He pretended to fight only for religion and the good of the people.
Page 182 - ... some account of the Saracens. These, you will remember, were Arabs, among whom Mahomet and his successors established an empire at the commencement of the seventh century. 2. The kings or rulers of the Saracen empire were called caliphs, and resided at Bagdad, a splendid city which they built near the river Tigris in Mesopotamia. I have told you how these caliphs extended their empire over a considerable part of Asia and Africa, and some portions of Europe. 3. To the north of Mesopotamia, there...

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