Fart Proudly: Writings of Benjamin Franklin You Never Read in School

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Enthea Press, 1990 - Humor - 128 pages
21 Reviews
Everyone knows Benjamin Franklin was one of the great philosophers of his time. But there was a side to him you were not exposed to in school -- a bawdy, scurrilous side that was all too eager to ignite the fires of controversy. From time to time, he would put some of his satirical ideas down on paper.

Fart Proudly is a testament to the rogue that lived inside the philosopher and statesman. It includes essays such as "A Letter to the Royal Academy, " "The Supreme Court of the Press, " "On Choosing A Mistress, " and "Rules on Making Oneself Disagreeable."

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Review: Fart Proudly: Writings of Benjamin Franklin You Never Read in School

User Review  - Johnny Saldana - Goodreads

Well written and well done. I believe Franklin himself would be proud. Read full review

Review: Fart Proudly: Writings of Benjamin Franklin You Never Read in School

User Review  - David Donhoff - Goodreads

What can be said about our Yankee Poppa Ben that hasn't already been said? We could use more like him! Read full review

Contents

Introduction
7
Alice Addertongue
22
Rules on Making Oneself Disagreeable
49
Copyright

1 other sections not shown

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About the author (1990)

One of 17 children, Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston on January 17, 1706. He ended his formal education at the age of 10 and began working as an apprentice at a newspaper. Running away to Philadelphia at 17, he worked for a printer, later opening his own print shop. Franklin was a man of many talents and interests. As a writer, he published a colonial newspaper and the well-known Poor Richard's Almanack, which contains his famous maxims. He authored many political and economic works, such as The Way To Wealth and Journal of the Negotiations for Peace. He is responsible for many inventions, including the Franklin stove and bifocal eyeglasses. He conducted scientific experiments, proving in one of his most famous ones that lightning and electricity were the same. As a politically active citizen, he helped draft the Declaration of Independence and lobbied for the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. He also served as ambassador to France. He died in April of 1790 at the age of 84.

Carl Japikse is an author, editor, and teacher who lives with his wife Rose in the north Georgia mountains. He is best known for his books of humor and the development of the mind.

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