Easter Rising 1916: Birth of the Irish Republic

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Osprey Publishing, 2007 - History - 96 pages
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When the outbreak of World War I (1914-1918) delayed home rule for Ireland, a faction of Irish nationalists - the Irish Republican Brotherhood - decided to take direct action and infiltrated a number of other nationalist and militia outfits.

On Easter Monday 1916, whilst armed men seized key points across Dublin, a rebellion was launched from the steps of the General Post Office (GPO) and Patrick Pearse proclaimed the existence of an Irish Republic and the establishment of a Provisional Government.

The British response was a military one and martial law was declared throughout Ireland. Over the next five days they drove the rebels back in violent street fighting until the Provisional Government surrendered on April 29. Central Dublin was left in ruins.
The leaders of the rising were tried by court martial: 15 of them were summarily executed and a further 3,500 'sympathizers' imprisoned. Although the majority of the Irish population was against the rebellion, the manner of its suppression began to turn their heads in favor of those who would call for independence from Britain 'at any cost.'

Covering in detail this important milestone in the ongoing Anglo-Irish struggle, bestselling author Michael McNally thoroughly examines the politics and tactics employed, to provide a well-researched study of the roots and outcome of this conflict. Furthermore, the array of unique photographs depicting this calamitous event help to bring to life one of the key episodes that shaped Irish history.
  

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Contents

ORIGINS OF THE CAMPAIGN
7
The question of Home Rule Ulster shall fight The Curragh lncident
16
OPPOSING PLANS
28
THE AFTERMATH
89
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Michael McNally is 40 years of age and was born, raised and educated in London. Of Irish parentage, Michael has an active interest in Irish history, and military history in particular. He is married with two children and lives in Germany where he works for a major reinsurance company. The author lives in Germany.

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