Air and Water: The Biology and Physics of Life's Media

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Princeton University Press, 1993 - Science - 341 pages
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The book begins with a brief, accessible review of the basic concepts of physics and then applies these tools to describe the properties of air and water, among them being density, viscosity, electrical resistivity, and diffusivity. In each case the property under discussion is examined in a biological context: Why can sperm whales act like hot air balloons when terrestrial animals cannot? Why are trees taller than kelps?
  

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Contents

The Fluid Environment
5
Basic Principles
11
Weight Pressure and Fluid Dynamics
23
How Fluid is the Fluid?
58
3 Locomotion
63
Random Walks in Air and Water
84
The Many Guises of Reynolds
111
Body Temperatures in Air and Water
145
Listening to the Environment
190
7 The Doppler Shift
210
Light in Air and Water
221
the Energy of the Interface
253
Surface Waves
271
Drying Out and Keeping Cool
296
A Thought at the End
315
Author Index
327

Electrical Resistivity and the Sixth Sense
174

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Page 321 - Measurement of the apparent dissociation constants of carbonic acid in seawater at atmospheric pressure, Limnol.

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About the author (1993)

Mark W. Denny is John and Jean DeNault Professor of Marine Science in the Biological Studies Department at Stanford University. He is author of "Air and Water: The Physics of Life s Media", "Species Invasions: Insights into Ecology, Evolution, and Biogeogaphy, " and "Biology and the Mechanics of the Wave-Swept Environment."Steven D. Gaines is Director of the Marine Science Institute at the University of California, Santa Barbara and coedited Marine Community Ecology. Together, Denny and Gaines coauthored "Chance in Biology: Using Probability to Explore Nature.

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