The Iliad of Homer (Google eBook)

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Belford, Clarke, 1884 - 500 pages
11 Reviews
  

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Review: The Iliad of Homer, Vols 1-2: Books 1-24

User Review  - Mollytrex - Goodreads

Awesome translation, Pope uses rhythms very well to set the tone through each book and does a good job of giving unique voices to the innumerable characters. A pleasant re-read of a true epic. Read full review

Review: The Iliad of Homer

User Review  - Aifa - Goodreads

Now I know how misleading the 1997 movie was. Well, not terribly...just slightly more than the usual with book adaptations. Read full review

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Page 291 - Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it.
Page 24 - Out of the night that covers me, Black as the Pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul.
Page 252 - A wise physician, skilled our wounds to heal, Is more than armies to the public weal.
Page 159 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground; Another race the following spring supplies; They fall successive, and successive rise: So generations in their course decay; So flourish these, when those are pass'd away.
Page 269 - Could all our care elude the gloomy grave, Which claims no less the fearful than the brave, For lust of fame I should not vainly dare In fighting fields, nor urge thy soul to war. But since, alas ! ignoble age must come, Disease, and death's inexorable doom, The life, which others pay, let us bestow, And give to fame what we to nature owe ; Brave though we fall, and honour'd if we live, Or let us glory gain, or glory give!
Page 82 - Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves.
Page 69 - Sheer o'er the crystal battlements : from morn To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day ; and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith like a falling star...
Page 31 - ... is so forcible in Homer, that no man of a true poetical spirit is master of himself while he reads him. What he writes, is of the most animated nature imaginable ; every thing moves, every thing lives, and is put in action. If a council be called, or a battle fought, you are not coldly informed of what was said or done as from a third person ; the reader is hurried out of himself by the force of the poet's imagination, and turns in one place to a hearer, in another to a spectator.
Page 407 - He bindeth up the waters in his thick clouds; and the cloud is not rent under them.
Page 25 - In the fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud. Under the bludgeonings of chance My head is bloody, but unbowed. Beyond this place of wrath and tears Looms but the Horror of the shade, And yet the menace of the years Finds and shall find me unafraid. It matters not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate : I am the captain of my soul.

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