The American Journal of International Law (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Baker, Voorhis & Company for the American Society of International Law, 1916 - International law
0 Reviews
The American Journal of International Law has been published quarterly since 1907 and is considered the premier English-language scholarly journal in its field. It features scholarly articles and editorials, notes and comment by preeminent scholars on developments in international law and international relations, and reviews of contemporary developments. The Journal contains summaries of decisions by national and international courts and arbitral and other tribunals, and of contemporary U.S. practice in international law. Each issue lists recent publications in English and other languages, many of which are reviewed in depth. Throughout its history, and particularly during first sixty years, the Journal has published full-text primary materials of particular importance in the field of international law. The contents of the current issue of the Journal are available on the ASIL web site.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 99 - The Contracting Powers agree not to have recourse to armed force for the recovery of contract debts claimed from the Government of one country by the Government of another country as being due to its nationals.
Page 318 - April twelfth, nineteen hundred, "temporarily to provide revenues and a civil government for Porto Rico, and for other purposes...
Page 67 - Spain cedes to the United States the island of Porto Rico and other islands now under Spanish sovereignty in the West Indies, and the island of Guam in the Marianas or Ladrones.
Page 840 - The jurisdiction of the nation, within its own territory, is necessarily exclusive and absolute; it is susceptible of no limitation, not imposed by itself.
Page 482 - But there is nothing in our laws, or in the law of nations, that forbids our citizens from sending armed vessels, as well as munitions of war, to foreign ports for sale. It is a commercial adventure which no nation is bound to prohibit, and which only exposes the persons engaged in it to the penalty of confiscation.
Page 566 - No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged, than the perfect equality of nations. Russia and Geneva have equal rights. It results from this equality, that no one can rightfully impose a rule on another. Each legislates for itself, but its legislation can operate on itself alone.
Page 6 - If a question of law to be decided is covered by a treaty in force between the belligerent captor and a Power which is itself, or whose subject or citizen is, a party to the proceedings, the court is governed by the provisions of the said treaty. In the absence of such provisions the court shall apply the rules of international law. If no generally recognized rule exists, the court shall give judgment in accordance with the general principles of justice and equity.
Page 582 - ... until the Government of that which deems itself aggrieved shall have maturely considered, in the spirit of peace and good neighborship, whether it would not be better that such difference should be settled by the arbitration of commissioners appointed on each side, or by that of a friendly nation.
Page 820 - Convention does not apply in this case, because of the "general participation" clause in Article 2 of the Hague Convention of 1907. That clause provided: "The provisions contained in the regulations (rules of land warfare) referred to in Article 1 as well as in the present convention do not apply except between contracting powers, and then only if all the belligerents are parties to the convention.
Page 487 - A neutral Power is not bound to prevent the export or transit, for the use of either belligerent, of arms, ammunition, or, in general, of anything which could be of use to an army or fleet.

Bibliographic information