Developmental Origins of Aggression

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Richard Ernest Tremblay, Willard W. Hartup, John Archer
Guilford Press, 2005 - Psychology - 480 pages
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"Offering the first comprehensive analysis of this topic in over 30 years, this book is sure to fuel discussion and debate among researchers, practitioners, and students in developmental psychology, child clinical psychology, child and adolescent psychiatry, criminology, and related disciplines. In the classroom, it is a unique and valuable text for graduate-level courses."--BOOK JACKET.
  

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Contents

Where Do We Stand?
3
THE DEVELOPMENT OF AGGRESSION IN ANIMALS AND HUMANS
23
Aggression Affiliation and the Development
47
Genetic and Environmental Factors Influencing the Expression
63
The Developmental Origins of Physical Aggression in Humans
83
The Beginnings of Aggression in Infancy
107
Play and the Regulation of Aggression
133
Social Construct
158
Mapping Brain Development and Aggression
242
Neuromodulators in the Development and Expression
261
Hormones and the Developmental Origins of Aggression
281
Executive Function in Early Physical Aggression
307
Language Development and Aggressive Behavior
330
The Intergenerational Transmission of Aggression
353
Peer Relationships and the Development of Aggressive
376
Social Capital and Physical Violence
398

Homicide Violence and Developmental Trajectories
202
Genetics and the Development of Aggression
223

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About the author (2005)

Richard E. Tremblay, PhD, is Professor of Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Psychology at the University of Montreal and Director of the Inter-University Research Unit on Children's Psychosocial Maladjustment. For over 20 years, he has conducted a program of longitudinal and experimental studies addressing the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of children from conception onward to understand the development and prevention of antisocial behavior.

Willard W. Hartup, EdD, is Regents' Professor Emeritus and former Director of the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Hartup has spent many years researching friendship and peer relations in child development, antipathies and their significance, and conflict and aggression in childhood and adolescence.

John Archer, PhD, is Professor of Psychology at the University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom. His research is concerned with human aggression, grief and loss, and sex differences. Dr. Archer is also the author of several books, including Sex and Gender (with Barbara Lloyd) and The Nature of Grief; numerous book chapters; and over 100 articles in refereed journals covering psychology, medicine, and biology. In recent years, he has published a number of meta-analytic reviews on topics connected with sex differences in aggression.

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