1491: new revelations of the Americas before Columbus

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Knopf, 2005 - History - 465 pages
1542 Reviews
Mann shows how a new generation of researchers equipped with novel scientific techniques have come to previously unheard-of conclusions about the Americas before the arrival of the Europeans: In 1491 there were probably more people living in the Americas than in Europe. Certain cities--such as Tenochtitlán, the Aztec capital--were greater in population than any European city. Tenochtitlán, unlike any capital in Europe at that time, had running water, beautiful botanical gardens, and immaculately clean streets. The earliest cities in the Western Hemisphere were thriving before the Egyptians built the great pyramids. Native Americans transformed their land so completely that Europeans arrived in a hemisphere already massively "landscaped" by human beings. Pre-Columbian Indians in Mexico developed corn by a breeding process that the journal Science recently described as "man's first, and perhaps the greatest, feat of genetic engineering."--From publisher description.

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The writing style was easy to read. - Goodreads
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Fascinating and informative, if a bit uneven.

Review: 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus

User Review  - Ashley Teagle - Goodreads

After reading "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" by Dee Brown, I admittedly rekindled my obsession with Native Americans. "1491" is not a book for the faint of heart but it is well worth the work it will ... Read full review

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Contents

Why Billington Survived
31
In the Land of Four Quarters
62
Frequently Asked Questions
97
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Charles C. Mann is a correspondent for Science and The Atlantic Monthly, and has cowritten four previous books including Noah’s Choice: The Future of Endangered Species and The Second Creation. A three-time National Magazine Award finalist, he has won awards from the American Bar Association, the Margaret Sanger Foundation, the American Institute of Physics, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, among others. His writing was selected for The Best American Science Writing 2003 and The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2003. He lives with his wife and their children in Amherst, Massachusetts.

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