Digital Evidence and Computer Crime: Forensic Science, Computers and the Internet

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Academic Press, 2004 - Computers - 690 pages
2 Reviews
Digital evidence--evidence that is stored on or transmitted by computers--can play a major role in a wide range of crimes, including homicide, rape, abduction, child abuse, solicitation of minors, child pornography, stalking, harassment, fraud, theft, drug trafficking, computer intrusions, espionage, and terrorism.
Though an increasing number of criminals are using computers and computer networks, few investigators are well-versed in the evidentiary, technical, and legal issues related to digital evidence. As a result, digital evidence is often overlooked,
collected incorrectly, and analyzed ineffectively. The aim of this hands-on resource is to educate students and professionals in the law enforcement, forensic science, computer security, and legal communities about digital evidence and computer crime.
This work explains how computers and networks function, how they can be involved in crimes, and how they can be used as a source of evidence. As well as gaining a practical understanding of how computers and networks function and how they can be used as evidence of a crime, readers will learn about relevant legal issues and will be introduced to deductive criminal profiling, a systematic approach to focusing an investigation and understanding criminal motivations.
Readers will receive access to the author's accompanying Web site which contains simulated cases that integrate many of the topics covered in the text. Frequently updated, these cases teaching individuals about:
* Components of computer networks
* Use of computer networks in an investigation
* Abuse of computer networks
* Privacy and security issues on computer networks
* The law as it applies to computer networks

* Provides a thorough explanation of how computers and networks function, how they can be involved in crimes, and how they can be used as a source of evidence
* Offers readers information about relevant legal issues
* Features coverage of the abuse of computer networks and privacy and security issues on computer networks
* Free unlimited access to author's Web site which includes numerous and frequently updated case examples
  

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Review: Digital Evidence and Computer Crime: Forensic Science, Computers and the Internet

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
PART 1 DIGITAL INVESTIGATION
7
PART 2 COMPUTERS
191
PART 3 NETWORKS
357
PART 4 INVESTIGATING COMPUTER CRIME
519
PART 5 GUIDELINES
625
BIBLIOGRAPHY
645
GLOSSARY
665
AUTHOR INDEX
675
SUBJECT INDEX
677
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Eoghan Casey is an internationally recognized expert in data breach investigations and information security forensics. He is founding partner of CASEITE.com, and co-manages the Risk Prevention and Response business unit at DFLabs. Over the past decade, he has consulted with many attorneys, agencies, and police departments in the United States, South America, and Europe on a wide range of digital investigations, including fraud, violent crimes, identity theft, and on-line criminal activity. Eoghan has helped organizations investigate and manage security breaches, including network intrusions with international scope. He has delivered expert testimony in civil and criminal cases, and has submitted expert reports and prepared trial exhibits for computer forensic and cyber-crime cases.

In addition to his casework and writing the foundational book Digital Evidence and Computer Crime, Eoghan has worked as R&D Team Lead in the Defense Cyber Crime Institute (DCCI) at the Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center (DC3) helping enhance their operational capabilities and develop new techniques and tools. He also teaches graduate students at Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute and created the Mobile Device Forensics course taught worldwide through the SANS Institute. He has delivered keynotes and taught workshops around the globe on various topics related to data breach investigation, digital forensics and cyber security.

Eoghan has performed thousands of forensic acquisitions and examinations, including Windows and UNIX systems, Enterprise servers, smart phones, cell phones, network logs, backup tapes, and database systems. He also has information security experience, as an Information Security Officer at Yale University and in subsequent consulting work. He has performed vulnerability assessments, deployed and maintained intrusion detection systems, firewalls and public key infrastructures, and developed policies, procedures, and educational programs for a variety of organizations. Eoghan has authored advanced technical books in his areas of expertise that are used by practitioners and universities around the world, and he is Editor-in-Chief of Elsevier's International Journal of Digital Investigation.

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