The Life of Major-General William H. Harrison ... (Google eBook)

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C. M. Saxton, Barker & Company, 1860 - 465 pages
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Page 405 - They hover over and harass our entering and departing commerce. To the most insulting pretensions they have added the most lawless proceedings in our very harbors, and have wantonly spilt American blood within the sanctuary of our territorial jurisdiction.
Page 404 - British subjects alone that, under the pretext of searching for these, thousands of American citizens, under the safeguard of public law and of their national flag, have been torn from their country and from everything dear to them; have been dragged on board ships of war of a foreign nation and exposed, under the severities of their discipline, to be exiled to the most distant and deadly climes, to risk their lives in the battles of their oppressors, and to be the melancholy instruments of taking...
Page 25 - June 1776, he submitted a resolution, declaring, " that the united colonies are and ought to be free and independent states ; that they are absolved from all allegiance, to the British crown ; and that all political connection, between them and the state of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved.
Page 339 - It would not become me to say that the fears of these patriots have been already realized; but as I sincerely believe that the tendency of measures and of men's opinions for some years past has been in that direction, it is, I conceive, strictly proper that I should take this occasion to repeat the assurances I have heretofore given of my determination to arrest the progress of that tendency if it really exists and restore the Government to its pristine health and vigor, as far as this can be effected...
Page 411 - ... highway of nations, even within sight of the country which owes them protection. We behold our vessels freighted with the products of our soil and industry, or returning with the honest proceeds of them, wrested from their lawful destinations, confiscated by prize courts, no longer the organ...
Page 350 - A decent and manly examination of the acts of the Government should be not only tolerated but encouraged. Upon another occasion I have given my opinion, at some length, upon the impropriety of Executive interference in the legislation of Congress; that the article in the Constitution making it the duty of the President to communicate information, and...
Page 343 - ... and, of course, that they would require no aid in conceiving and maturing the measures which the circumstances of the country might require. And it is preposterous to suppose that a thought could for a moment have been entertained that the President, placed at the capital, in the center of the country, could better understand the wants and wishes of the people than their own immediate representatives, who spend a part of every year among them, living with them, often laboring with them, and bound...
Page 26 - It will be all over with me in a moment ; but you will be kicking in the air half an hour after I am gone.
Page 433 - States to be the sole and absolute sovereigns of all the territory ceded to them by a treaty of peace, made between them and the King of Great Britain, the fourteenth day of January, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-four.
Page 408 - ... Great Britain ; not as supplying the wants of her enemies, which . she herself supplies ; but as interfering with the monopoly which she covets for her own commerce and navigation. She carries on a war against the lawful commerce of a friend that she may the better carry on a commerce with an enemy a commerce polluted by the forgeries and perjuries which are for the most part the only passports by which it can succeed.

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