Proceedings (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1884 - Education
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Page 84 - By their fruits ye shall know them. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles ? Even so every good tree bringeth forth good fruit; but the corrupt tree bringeth forth evil fruit.
Page 131 - Under this article of the constitution it rests with congress to decide what government is the established one in a State. For as the United States guarantee to each State a republican government, congress -must necessarily decide what government is established in the State before it can determine whether it is republican or not.
Page xxiii - To elevate the character and advance the interests of the profession of teaching, and to promote the cause of popular education in the United States.
Page 18 - The days of our years are threescore years and ten ; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labor and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we fly away.
Page 123 - There shall be reserved the lot No. 16, of every township, for the maintenance of public schools, within the said township...
Page xxiv - The President shall preside at all meetings of the Association and of the Board of Directors, and shall perform the duties usually devolving upon a presiding officer.
Page 123 - We are accustomed . . . to praise the lawgivers of antiquity; we help to perpetuate the fame of Solon and Lycurgus; 80 FATHERS OF THE CONSTITUTION but I doubt whether one single law of any lawgiver, ancient or modern, has produced effects of more distinct, marked and lasting character than the Ordinance of 1787.
Page xxv - The annual meeting of the Association shall be held at such time and place as shall be determined by the Board of Directors. SEC.
Page xxv - Association. \ 5, Special meetings may be held at such other times and places as the Board or the President shall determine.
Page 132 - That every power vested in a government is in its nature sovereign, and includes, by force of the term, a right to employ all the means requisite and fairly applicable to the attainment of the ends of such power, and which are not precluded by restrictions and exceptions specified in the Constitution, or not immoral, or not contrary to the essential ends of political society.

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