Vanity Fair: A Novel Without a Hero (Google eBook)

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Bradbury and Evans, 1849 - 624 pages
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Review: Vanity Fair

User Review  - Konain - Goodreads

William Makepeace Thackeray, the writer of this novel was born in Calcutta and is considered to be one of the best satirist in English Literature. In this novel he has torn open the effable mask of ... Read full review

Review: Vanity Fair

User Review  - Alex - Goodreads

Vanity Fair is sometimes called the best British novel ever written, but it's totally not. Middlemarch is way better. Honestly, VF's not even in the top ten. So why do people love it so much? Because ... Read full review

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Page 434 - Moreover his mother made him a little coat, and brought it to him from year to year, when she came up with her husband to offer the yearly sacrifice.
Page 163 - There ought to be a law in Vanity Fair ordering the destruction of every written document (except receipted tradesmen's bills) after a certain brief and proper interval. Those quacks and misanthropes who advertise indelible Japan ink should be made to perish along with their wicked discoveries. The best ink for Vanity Fair use would be one that faded utterly in a couple of days, and left the paper clean and blank, so that you might write on it to somebody else.
Page 6 - All which details, I have no doubt, JONES, who reads this book at his Club, will pronounce to be excessively foolish, trivial, twaddling, and ultra-sentimental. Yes ; I can see Jones at this minute (rather flushed with his joint of mutton and halfpint of wine), taking out his pencil and scoring under the words "foolish, twaddling," &c., and adding to them his own remark of
Page 281 - All our friends took their share and fought like men in the great field. All day long, whilst the women were praying ten miles away, the lines of the dauntless English infantry were receiving and repelling the furious charges of the French horsemen. Guns which were heard at Brussels were...
Page 19 - His valet made a fortune out of his wardrobe : his toilet-table was covered with as many pomatums and essences as ever were employed by an old beauty: he had tried, in order to give himself a waist, every girth, stay, and waistband then invented.
Page 126 - You shall do what you like ; spend what you like ; and 'av it all your own way. I'll make you a zettlement. I'll do everything reglar. Look year!" and the old man fell down on his knees and leered at her like a satyr. Rebecca started back a picture of consternation. In the course of this history we have never seen her lose her presence of mind ; but she did now, and wept some of the most genuine tears that ever fell from her eyes. "Oh, Sir Pitt!" she said. "Oh, siró Ió I'm married already.
Page 36 - Your children will so do and be done by, in all probability. Down came the wicket again ; and Dobbin started up. I can't tell what his motive was. Torture in a public school is as much licensed as the knout in Russia. It would be ungentlemanlike (in a manner) to resist it. Perhaps Dobbin's foolish soul revolted against that exercise of tyranny; or perhaps he had a hankering feeling of revenge in his mind, and longed to measure himself against that splendid bully and tyrant, who had all the glory,...
Page 76 - MacWhirter's fat coachman, the beer is grown much stronger, and the consumption of tea and sugar in the nursery (where her maid takes her meals) is not regarded in the least. Is it so, or is it not so ? I appeal to the middle classes.
Page 442 - Becky has often spoken in subsequent years of this season of her life, when she moved among the very greatest circles of the London fashion. Her success excited, elated, and then bored her. At first no occupation was more pleasant than to invent and procure (the latter a work of no small trouble and ingenuity, by the way, in a person of Mrs. Rawdon Crawley's very narrow means) ó to procure, we say, the prettiest...
Page 534 - Cook lurks down before daylight to scour her pots and pans in the kitchen; by which young Master stealthily ascends, having left his boots in the hall, and let himself in after dawn from a jolly night at the Club; down which Miss comes rustling in fresh ribbons and spreading muslins, brilliant and beautiful, and prepared for conquest and the ball...

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